there is a citizenship of the United States and citizenship of a state,

“The government of the United States is a foreign corporation with respect to a state.”
In re Merriam, 36 N. E. 505, 141 N. Y. 479, affirmed 16 S. Ct. 1073, 163 U. S. 625, 41 L.Ed. 287

The District of Columbia is not a state.  There is no star on the American flag representing the District of Columbia.

“We have in our political system a government of the United States and a government of each of the several States.  Each one of these governments is distinct from the others, and each has citizens of it’s own…”
United States v. Cruikshank, 92 U.S. 542 (1875)

“…he was not a citizen of the United States, he was a citizen and voter of the State,…”  “One may be a citizen of a State an yet not a citizen of the United States”.
McDonel v. The State, 90 Ind. 320 (1883)

“That there is a citizenship of the United States and citizenship of a state,…”
Tashiro v. Jordan, 201 Cal. 236 (1927)

“A citizen of the United States is a citizen of the federal government …”
Kitchens v. Steele, 112 F.Supp 383

“…rights of national citizenship as distinct from the fundamental or natural rights inherent in state citizenship”.
Madden v. Kentucky, 309 U.S. 83: 84 L.Ed. 590 (1940)

SUI  JURIS. One who has all the rights to which a freemen is entitled; one  who is not under the power of another, as a slave, a minor, and the like.
2. To make a valid contract, a person must, in general, be sui juris.  Every one of full age is presumed to be sui juris. Story on Ag. p. 10.
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856

INGENUI, civ. law. Those freemen who were born free. Vicat, vocab.
2. They were a class of freemen, distinguished from those who, born  slaves, had afterwards legally obtained their freedom the latter were called  at various periods, sometimes liberti, sometimes libertini. An unjust or  illegal servitude did not prevent a man from being ingenuus.
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856

JURIS ET DE JURE. A phrase employed to denote conclusive presumptions of  law, which cannot be rebutted by evidence. The words signify of law and from  law. Best on Presumption, Sec. 17.
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, 1856

http://www.state-citizen.org/

http://www.state-citizen.org/files/

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