An Important Page American and World Financials

IMPORTANT LINKS TO SHARE WITH OTHERS  

Inspired by

John Fulks,  jfulks34@gmail.com

https://kmaclub.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/montru_report-page-99-frisco.pdf 

Pujo Committee Investigation, Payseur Family Trust « kmaclub

<https://kmaclub.wordpress.com/348-2/>

http://books.google.com/books?id=17ABGu3q8xkC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Art+of+Passing+the+Buck,+Vol+I;+Secrets+of+Wills+and+Trusts+Revealed+by+Charles+Arthur&hl=en&ei=FTpBTt2xCOeysALJ8rTWCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=payseur%20&f=false

Payseur or more accurately Lewis Cass Payseur.

There supposedly a book titled “Pandora’s Box” by Alex Christoper that was referenced in The Art of Passing the Buck, Vol I; Secrets of Wills and Trusts Revealed by Charles Arthur on page 49- The Arthur book mentioned the Money Trust Investigation AKA THE Pujo Committee:  an Investigation of Financial and Monetary Conditions in the United States Under House Resolutions Nos. 429 and 504 <http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/publications/montru/>

A Congressional subcommittee which was formed between May 1912 and January 1913 to investigate the so-called “money trust”, a small group of Wall Street bankers that exerted powerful control over the nation’s finances. After a resolution introduced by congressman Charles Lindbergh Sr. for a probe on Wall St. power, Arsène Pujo of Louisiana obtained congressional authorization to form a subcommittee of the House Committee on Banking and Currency. J. P. Morgan, George F. Baker, and other financiers testified.

The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 24, 1912, Image 14

Image provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-12-24/ed-1/seq-14/

The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 24, 1912, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-12-24/ed-1/seq-14/

(With Regards to the Pujo Committee.)
We are looking, we are looking for the Masters of Finance,And it’s no use fleeing from us as we dauntlessly advance
With a summons and subpoena and a warrant in our hand
And with double barreled questions and an air of stern command;
We are trailing wily captains of the wicked system camp
And the malefactors tremble when they hear our sturdy tramp;
There are men of mighty millions who were never known to quail
Till they heard us stepping softly as we hit upon their trail.
Let the Wall Street powers, thunder, we are not a bit afraid,
We’re the bravest little hunters that you ever say arrayed.
We’ve been probing, poking, peeking through the jungle where they
roam,
And when we’ve got ’em captured through our skill and courage
high
The fierce and savage monsters who are feared in every home;
We’ll put ’em on the witness stand and make ’em testify.
We’re out for big game hanting
And when at last we’ve got ’em,

     http://mises.org/books/chaostheory.pdf

http://www.ibge.gov.br/paisesat/main.php

http://www.boomandbustinvestor.com/pages/bnb/video/BNB1.php?pub=BNB&code=EBNBM802&o=430452&s=433876&u=29280838&l=295194&r=Milo

Peyseur trust

LEWIS CASS PAYSEUR TRUST CO

Single Location > 2800 OVERHILL RD, BIRMINGHAM, AL

 

http://creditreports.dnb.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/IballValidationCmd?storeId=11154&catalogId=71154&searchType=BSF&busName=payseur+trust&state=US&country=US&cm_mmc=dnb-_-home-_-retail-_-lookup

payseur trust

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_globalbanking35.htm

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/archivos_pdf/pandorabox_payseur.pdf

http://www.scribd.com/doc/8828750/The-Ultimate-Unseen-Hand-Behind-the-New-World-Order-666-Pandoras-BOX

http://truthspress.wordpress.com/an-expose-unseen-hand-behind-the-nwo/

http://maxiganarticles.webs.com/illuminatibloodlines.htm

http://www.archive.org/details/TheFreemasonicArchitectureofHistory

http://ia700400.us.archive.org/28/items/TheFreemasonicArchitectureofHistory/TheArchitectureOFHistory168pages.pdf

http://www.threeworldwars.com/occult.htm

Payseur Trust | Ron Paul 2012 | Sound Money, Peace and Liberty

Payseur Trust … minerals in this country is just about depleted due to the mineral land companies …
Found exclusively on: Yahoo! Search
GAALT – The most powerful company you have never heard of

Daniel Payseur (Louis the 17th) Jonas Payseur Lewis Cass Payseur
www.godlikeproductions.com/…rum1/message1092908/pg1

ASSETS OF LEWIS CASS PA YSEUR
As Recorded in book 665, Page 20
The following is a list of only one third of the companies which are listed in public records as the assets of
Lewis Cass Payseur which have been assigned to the Lewis Cass Payseur Trust Company Inc.
All of the Companies listed here were each issued, upon formation, fifty thousand (50,000) preferred, or
special “Class “A” Shares, those being the only such shares authorized and issued, which shares represented
the true ownership of the corporation.
L. C. Payseur owned nine tenths of all of the preferred share issued of each of these companies forty five
thousand (45,000) and the rest of the world owns only five thousand (5,000) shares of the issued stock.
Common shares, or “non-voting shares” are the ones, where applicable, which are traded on the stock
exchange, and they do not reflect the ownership as is commonly thought.
Note: Companies listed in the Fortune 500 Magazine of May 5, 1980 are noted by the name of the
Company followed by “(#—)”,
This is not a complete list of the Payseur Assets as this is only one third of his holdings, the estate was filed
in three different locations with different assets listed at each state and county site that it was filed in. In
another attempt to cover up the ownership trail, but you can get an idea of the magnitude of his holding
with this 1/3 list.
Railway. Railroad and Related Companies
Lancaster & Chester Railway Company
Cheraw & Chester Railroad Company
Leased for 99 years to the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company, executed October 3, 1882.
and recorded in the Court of Probate and the County Recorders office of Chester County. South Carolina.
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, South Carolina Division:
Along with the liens of the “iron rails and cross-ties” of lines under 99 year leases which have been merged
into the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company: some known as:
Catawba Valley Railway Company: Chester County, South Carolina
The Chattanooga. Augusta and Charleston Air Line Railway Co., recorded in Chester County, South Carolina.
The Memphis / Charleston Railroad Company: The Seaboard Air Lines System of Railroads Company, as
recorded in the office of the Probate Judge in and for the County of Dorchester, South Carolina, in Book “S
23” at Page 7, Dated December 9. 1899.
The Port Royal Railroad Company, as recorded with the office of the Probate Judge of Barnwell County,
South Carolina.
The Chester and Lenoir Narrow Gauge Railroad Company, as recorded in the County of Chester, South
Carolina, formerly known as the Wilmington. Charlotte and Rutherfordton Railway Company, as formed in
the City of Lincolnton, North Carolina, by the Payseur family.
Buffalo, Union and Carlisle Railway:- Union. South Carolina
C. and W.C. Railway: Anderson. South Carolina
Atlantic Coast Line Railway Company:- Richland. South Carolina
G. & F. Railway Company: Greenwood, South Carolina
C. N. & L. Railway Company: Newberry, South Carolina
283
H. and B. Railway Company:- Colleton, South Carolina
C. and L. Railway Company:- Chesterfield, South Carolina
C. M. and C. Railway Company:- Chesterfield, South Carolina
Northwestern South Carolina Railway Company:- Spartanburg, South Carolina
Atlanta and Charlotte Railway Company:- Spartanburg, South Carolina
Ashville and Spartanburg Railway Company:- Spartanburg, South Carolina
Spartanburg, Union and Columbia Railway Company:- Spartanburg. S. C.
Columbia and Greenville Railway Company:- Greenville. South Carolina
Southern Railway Company, South Carolina Division:- Columbia, South Carolina
South Side Railroad Co.:- Connecting Atlanta. Georgia with Washington, D. C.
Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad Company and Alabama Mineral Land Company of New York parent
to the famed Standard Oil now Exxon Oil.
Ashley Branch and Coal Line Railway Company
Georgia. Carolina and Northern Railroad: and its 99 year lease to Seaboard Air Line Railway Company
King’s Mountain Gold Mine and Railroad Company: Companies listed in Real Property Book 1734 Page 62 et.
seq.. Court of Probate, in Alabama
Louisville and Nashville Railroad
Nashville and Decatur Railroad
The Great Southern Railroad Line
South and North Alabama Railroad
Mobile and Montgomery Railroad
Georgia Pacific and T. A., Louisville Ky.
Pennsylvania Railroad: See Chart on Penn Central Company, 6.5 Billion Dollar Empire
Mexican Railway:- Mexico City, Mexico
Mexican Central Railway:- Guadalajara, Mexico
New York Central Railroad
Southern Pacific Railroad
Missouri Pacific Railroad
Mobile and Ohio Railroad
Charleston, Cincinnati and Chicago Railroad Company (the Federal Reserve)
Narrow Gauge, Camden, Lancaster, Charlotte, all in North Carolina
Georgia Pacific Railroad Company (#56)
Pullman Company (builders of Pullman cars for the Railways)
Banks and Related Companies
Bank of Lancaster:- Lancaster County. South Carolina
First Bank and Trust Company:-Of Lancaster, South Carolina
The Lancaster Building and Loan Association
The Bank of Heath Springs
The Bank of Charleston
The Bank of Kershaw
Kershaw Mercantile and Banking Company
National Loan and Exchange Bank of Columbia
First National Bank of Camden
National Exchange Bank of Chester
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York
New York Trust Company
The Bank of Richmond
National Loan and Exchange Bank of Camden
284
Raleigh Savings Bank
American Trust and Savings Bank – Birmingham, Al.
Birmingham Trust and Savings Bank – Birmingham, A l .
Chase National Bank
Riggs National Bank
Hanover National Bank – New York
Brandvwine Bank – Maryland
Hamilton National Bank
South Carolina National Bank
Jefferson Savings and Loan Association
Bank of South Carolina
Bank of New York
Bank of Macon, Georgia
Pennsvlvania National Bank
Sandoz Bank
Painsville. Ohio Bank
Cotton Mills
Lancaster Cotton Mills:-Now known as Springs Mills Inc. of Lancaster, S. C …………….. (#319)
The Eureka Cotton Mills
The Springstein Cotton Mills
Dan River Cotton Mills:-Danville, VA
Lorav Cotton Mills
Belton Cotton Mills
The Lancaster Cotton Oil Company
The N. K. Fairbank Company (Cotton Oil). Chicago. III.
Thread and Sewing Machine Companies
Singer Manufacturing Company:-New York
The New Home Sewing Machine Company:-30 Union Sq., New York Household Sewing Machine Company:-
Providence, Rhode Island
Hartford Sewing Machine Company:-Connecticut
Renington Sewing Machine Company
Domestic Sewing Machine Company
Clark’s O.N.T. Cotton Thread Company
Corticelli Silk Thread Company
Pharr and Long Clothiers 42 S. Tryon St., Charlotte, N.C.
J.P. Coats Thread Company
Willimantic Thread Company and/or
Willimantic Linen Company
Chicago-Kenosha Hosiery Company:-Kenosha, Wisconsin
E.C.Stahn and Company:-Chester, S. C. (Watches, Jewelry and sewing machines)
Electric and Power Companies
Southern Power Company
Duke Power Company
Lancaster Light and Power Company
Potomac Electric Company
General Electric
Company ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………(#9)
Gold and Silver Companies
285
Reed Gold Mine
Gastonia Gold Mine
Gold Hill Mining Company
King’s Mountain Gold Mine (and Railway Company as above)
Clyta Oro Mining Company-Supplied all the gold for the Federal Reserve
Union Silver Company
Lotowana Silver Mining Company
Iron and Steel (and other metals) Companies
Lincoln Iron Company (formerly Lincolnton Tin Mine and Smelter) now Carnegie Steel)
Woodward Iron Company
Ingall’s Steel Company
The Ingalls Iron Works Company of Birmingham. Alabama
Carnegie Steel Company
Aluminum Company of American (ALCOA) ……………………………………………………………………………………..(#63)
Motor Vehicle Companies
American Motors Company……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….(#109)
General Motors Corporation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
(# 2)
Cadillac Motor Car Company
Carolina Cadillac Company Studebaker Carriages and Wagons Company
Insurance Companies
Home Insurance Company 119 Broadway. New York (From Orrville and Selma, Alabama, allegedly the
parent to all insurance companies )
Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York
Old American Insurance Company:- Kansas City
William’s and Gregory Insurance Company:- Lancaster. S. C.
Tobacco and Related Companies
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company…….. (#39)
George W. Helme and Company (Helme’s Railroad Mill Snuff) Helmetta, N.J.
American Tobacco Company
Regalia De La Francis Cigar Company
Watch Companies
Elgin National Watch Company
National “Elgin” Watch Company
I l l i n o i s “Springfield” Watch Company
American “Waltham” Watch Company
The Centennial (1776-1876) Watch Company
Waterbury Watch Company
Land and Real Estate Companies
Alabama Mineral Land Company of New York
Woodgin Plantation:-Leased to Frisco Railroad
Bondurant Plantation:-Leased to St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad
T. M. Hughes Real Estate Agency:-Lancaster, S. C.
286
Food and Other Household Goods
Gail Borden, Eagle Brand Milk Company……………………………………………………………………………… (#73 Borden)
The Genessee Pure Food Company ……………………………………………………………………………. (#50 General Foods)
Heinzs Pickle Company…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. (#139 Heinz 57)
The American Cereal Company……………………………………………………………………………………. (#176 Quaker Oals)
United Fruit Trading Company:- Linked to Grace Shipping Lines
Armour and Company:-(Formerly Armour Meat Packing Company)
The Lancaster Hardware Company
Mimaugh’s Department Store
Bibb’s Stove and Range Company
Swift and Company
The Woolson Spice Company
Cleveland’s Baking Powder Company
White Mountain Ice Cream Freezer Company
Arbuckle Brothers Coffee Company
King’s Buckwheat Flour Company
Lustro Cleaners Company
Lincolnton Drug Company: Became Rexall Drugs
Fleming Brothers Cologne
New Mown Hay Sachet Colgate and Company. Perfumers of New York
Boll Brothers Manufacturing Company Harrisburg, Pa. (metal beds and bedding)
Tarrant’s Aperient Seltzer Company
Celluloid Eye Glasses Company (Patent #03-13-1877) S.O.M. Company
Steele and Price Manufacturing Company (Yeast, flavoring extracts etc., Chicago, III.)
Brown’s Iron Bitters Company
Richmond Heater Company (wood burning heaters)
Charles W.S. Banks Furniture Company Baltimore, Md
Peloubet and Company, Bloomfield. NJ – Mfr. Standard Brand Organs
Ehvet Magnesia Mfg Company
Boston Rubber Shoe Company
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
Miscellaneous Companies
Colt Firearms
Company……………………………………….. ……………………………………..(#165)
Standard Oil Company…………………………………………………………………………………………………………#10, #6, and
#32)
Exxon
Corporation………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….(#1)
B. F. Goodrich
Company……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. (#112)
Sherwin-Williams Paint
Company ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. (#251)
The Fort Mill Manufacturing Company
Catawba Fertilizer Company
Lancaster Manufacturing Company
Western Union Telegraph Company
Ashley Phosphate Fertilizer Company
Steamship (British) Manhattan
Lancaster Merchantile Company
Pearl Powder Company
H.S. Robinson and Company
Walter A. Wood Company of New York
Knapp and Company of New York
287
Scott and Bowne Manufacturing Company of New York
Reinthanl and Newman of New York
J. Lichtenstein and Son of New York
Bimbel Brothers Stores New York and Philadelphia
Rochester Photo Press of Rochester, New York
Newmond and Company Buffalo, New York
I. C. Hood and Company
E.W. Hoyte and Company
Dr. J. C. Bayer and Company-Bayer Aspirin Co.
Hill and Greene
Ed V. Price and Company
W. B. Clapp, Young and Company
Hurst, Purnell and Company
National Twist Drill and Tool Co.
Millhiser’s Manufacturing Company
Joseph Emmanuel and Company
Silverine Company-Onieda Silver Co.
J. P. Stevens and Brothers (paper mill)
The Hamilton Company of Canada
Cabbet and Company of Spain
In order to keep the true ownership hidden from the government and the public all of these companies and
hundreds more were tucked away in parent corporations and companies, almost all of the railroads across the
united states were merged into the new “Southern Railway”, merger of 1906 that J. P. Morgan helped
orchestrate for Payseur.
The Southern Railway, which contained almost all of the railway companies were hidden in one little
insignificant short railway line that was called the “Lancaster and Chester Railway Company”. The family
joke is that they own a little railroad company by the name of the L&C Railway Company and it has a spur
line called Southern Railway, which is obstinately all the railroads. They also own one other important little
railroad, “The Cheraw and Chester Railroad Company”.
The Lancaster and Chester Railway, was owned by a cotton mill by the name of the “Lancaster Cotton
Mill”, which was owned by L.C. Payseur, the name of Lancaster Cotton Mill was changed in the 1930’s to
Springs Mills Inc. but the ownership was still by L.C. Payseurs’. It is very important that you remember
this one little paragraph.
L.C. Payseur also owned “The Bank of Lancaster”, which in recent years has gone on a name changing
tangent the last known names were the (NCNB) North Carolina National Bank then it merged with its self and
became known as NationsBank For a short digression, research discovered that in the 1980’s George Bush
became the chairman of the executive committee of First International Bank of Houston. He also became a
director of Fist International Bank shares. Inc. (“InterFirst”). InterFirst became the largest bank in Texas and
was reportedly running speculation all over South America, China and Europe. Later InterFirst merged with
Republic Bank in 1987 to form First Republic Bank, eventually as it appeared all banks in Texas got into a non
sovereign situation if you can believe that. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, with the connivance of
the IRS, awarded the assets of First Republic Bank to the North Carolina National Bank in exchange for no
payment whatsoever on the part of NCNB. Why should they have to pay themselves? NationsBank, which is
reputedly a darling of the intelligence community, which is not quite right but makes some sense, being as the
banks and CIA are owned by the railroad.

Payseur also owned “Southern Power Company” which is today known as “Southern Company” and owns
the control of all power companies in the united states by law that states that only railroads can manufacture
electricity. That is why everyone that comes up with a better and cheaper form of energy and would become a
threat to the power company is put out of business. Because the railroad has a monopoly at least until the 99
year leases are up.
288
Payseur owned “The Lancaster Manufacturing Company”, which controlled the production of all wood
products, such as railroad ties, railroad cars, service poles, furniture, paper etc., etc.. This is were the railroad
land grants come in wi t h such names as Boise Cascade, Weyerhaeuser, Crown Zellierback. Mead, Regency
companies using the railroad land leased to them “only” from Payseur to product trees for wood products.
These companies do not own the land they operate under leases, they do not have the right to sell railroad or
timber land that they use. they do not own the land nor the companies.
Mr. Payseur also owned a company by the name of “The Lancaster Cotton Oil”, this company started the
manufacture of fertilizer and other related items.
Leroy Springs was appointed President of all of Mr. Payseurs companies to oversee them, he was also Mr.
Payseurs’ attorney and a trustee for his affairs. He was trusted with all kinds of important documents, affidavits
and secrets, as to who the true owners were of these companies. Remember that it was stated earlier that the
northerner’s couldn’t get the southern people to work for them, so Northerners would appoint the old exconfederate
officers to run the companies owned by Yankees after the Civil War and all the confiscation’s.
That is how Leroy Springs got involved with the Lancaster Cotton Mill, and the other companies. He was a
manager not an owner.
289


http://www.apostilla.com/rush-apostille-services-2

by Alex Christopher

1993

extracted from “Pandora’s Box – The Ultimate ‘Unseen Hand’ Behind the New World Order”

There are certain sources in the Council of Foreign Relations and Trilateral Commission that want things that are going on known to people. There has been knowledge given as to what the international Bankers intend to do worldwide. There is one very powerful group of people who literally hold the money control of every nation in the world.

They control most all the world governments through finance. And for all intents and purposes they are the sole government of the world, even at this time. You possibly have not realized that fact as of yet, but you will. As you know from a previous chapter in this book the Federal Reserve System is a individually owned corporation and it controls the money, the interest rates, the general economy and the daily market prices of gold and silver.

It is NOT an agency of the United States Federal Government; and it never has been! It is a privately-owned corporation.
Supposedly, thirteen families which are thought to control the central banks and the hard currency countries of the world. It is commonly thought that they own the majority of the stock and control the regional banks of the Federal Reserve System. It is proven knowledge that anytime someone or a group of people are involved in the organization of a scheme, they use sacrificial lambs for the public viewing so as that the person or persons that are orchestrating the whole show are never seen or known.

This is the case with the Federal Reserve System in America, which has interlocking controls globally because it is all part of one parent that traverses the globe, Railroads. And there is a monopoly held for Railroads and Banking.

All of the people and banking houses that appear to be “separate entities” are all part of this parent; how they became involved goes all the way back to the early 1800’s and the great grand parents in the family bloodline that were hired by the Payseur family to become life estate Trustees, based on 99 year leases and Trusteeships expiring June 17, 1993 and December 31, 1993, for certain banks and corporations that reach around the globe. (see Lewis Cass Payseur and His Assets – 1850-1939)

All these families were trustee for the Payseur conglomerate. These Trustees do not really “own” these corporations or banks; they are all in Trust.
The group of heir Trustees listed below control the policy-making and decision making of the central banks of the leading nations of the world.

  • Lehman Brothers Bank of New York
  • Kuhn, Loeb Bank of New York
  • Chase Manhattan Bank of New York
  • Boldman, Sachs Bank of New York
  • Chemical Bank of New York
  • Citibank Bank of New York
  • Schroder Banking of New York
  • Brown Brothers & Harriman
  • William S. Sneath
  • Wachovia Bank
  • Warburg Bank of Hamburg and Amsterdam
  • Israel Moses Self Banks of Italy
  • Lazares Brothers Banks of Paris
  • Rothschild Banks of London and Berlin

One short note about the Rothschilds at this time, the last bank mogul and tyrant of the Rothschilds was murdered sometime in 1990 and there is someone else controlling now, not a Rothschild.

The above-listed banking houses, to an extent, manipulate the daily prices of gold and silver on the exchange. The “hard currency countries” are those countries whose currency is not allowed to fluctuate as much as the other countries’ currency fluctuates.

The American dollar is the standard for all of the currency in the world. Wherever the American dollar goes, it affects other nations in relation to our dollar. These corporations, banks and railroads reach into almost every country of the world at this time; they have control of these countries.

They practice fractional reserve banking.

Fractional Reserve Lending
Fractional Reserve Lending, an exclusive ability of only Federal Reserve member institutions, is wholly and solely responsible for the fact that the nation’s money supply in circulation is in fact comprised over 97% credit for which nowhere on earth has there ever existed the printed currency equivalent.

Today, every lending institution in America practices this, and that doesn’t include the interest on the debts, that is only the principal.

Where does the interest come from?

You know it as the “National Debt.”
Federal Reserve and The Nigerian Coup

It was fractional reserve lending which was swiftly instituted immediately before a pentagon official and three other U.S. government officials and the New York bankers went to the Prime Minister of Nigeria in the 1970s.

They gave him $50,000,000 to more than double the price of their light crude oil. This crude oil from Nigeria is one of the most valuable crude oils in the world. And this was all done immediately prior to losing his life in a coup which was orchestrated by U. S. covert para-military personnel trained in Belize (the British Honduras).

Shortly after the Prime Minister’s death U.S. officials had flown on to Kuwait and persuaded its oil producers to sell their oil at the inflated price of $30 per barrel.
Federal Reserve Lending and the Middle East
Why were these astute U.S. emissaries prepared to purchase the Arabs’ oil at this greatly inflated price?

The answer is both awesome and terrifying. U.S. government officials were prepared and authorized to agree to purchase the oil form the Persian Gulf states and the United Arab Emirates upon two seemingly innocuous conditions.

The first condition was that O.P.E.C. – which was to have so much anti-Arab propaganda spewed up against it later was to become a reality and insist that all oil sales worldwide were in the future to be dollar denominated. The second and more sinister condition foisted upon the unsuspecting Arabs was the U.S. oil companies purchasing the crude would not remit the sales proceeds back to the Middle East and Third World Nations.

Rather, the Arabs were invited as a prerequisite of sale at the inflated price to purchase long-term, 20 and 30-year Certificates of Deposit locked into their depositor banks. This “coincidental” relationship arose between the controllers of the purchasing oil companies and the controllers of the banks from which the Arabs “chose” to purchase their 20 and 30-year C.D.’s.

It is all part of the railroad and banking monster created by the Payseur family.
In simplest terms, what is this “fractional reserve lending”?

As evidenced by the fact that the money in circulation cannot be matched with currency in existence save in a negative ratio of about 66.6 to 1, it is fraud. Can you lend anyone $1 if 66.6 of it has never been coined: The answer is “yes” if you are a member of The Federal Reserve System.
An oil company issues a check for $1 million to an Arab seller’s stateside agent. The figures are crossed out of the oil company’s account at. say. Chase Manhattan and inserted into a 30-year Certificate of Deposit in the Arab’s name on the computer. The Arab has been paid.

Who then owns Standard Oil now known as Exxon? Who then owns Chase Manhattan?

The answer to both questions is that they are both lost in the maze of consolidated corporations of railroads known as Southern Railway which is owned by the Payseur family. What happens next? The crude is refined. The costs and profits are passed on to the U.S. public. “That dirty Arab Cartel” is blamed. But at $2 per gallon it is the oil companies account which receives the revenue.

Meanwhile, what is happening to that Arab’s account?

It shows $1 million. In fact the bank in our example, Chase Manhattan, has deposited that $1 million-a-piece of paper with $1 million written on it – to The Federal Reserve Clearing System which “pursuant to Fractional Reserve Lending Policy” authorizes Chase Manhattan to loan at “x60” sixty million to Mexico, Brazil, the U.S. Congress – whomever it pleases – promulgating the overwhelming falsehood that there is too much currency in the market and not enough borrowers.

The banks particularly in the U.S. to which their countries were indebted through the International Monetary Fund, were calling for revisions and amendments to those nations’ constitutions; the better to accommodate the corporate associates of those banks in those corporations designs to establish operations within the nations concerned.

And those “trusted pillars of society” – The Federal Reserve Members – for every $1 million recorded due in about 25 years to the Arab, has the burden of paying that Arab about $70,000 per year and is only making from the government a staggering $6 million per year and requiring at the same time $60 million per year as repayment because of Trilateral originated policy issued by Congress.

This scenario exists because of those that have seized control of the Federal Reserve and all the other corporations that were originally organized by the Payseur family.
It is becoming clear now why in the early to mid 70’s the price of gasoline increased. The price increase of oil going to the Arabs would come right back to their banks in 30-year Time Certificate deposits. Now, take a look at what they did with those 30 year Time Certificates and you can start realizing what has happened to the people of the world and the economy.
Sheif Yamani and the other oil barons did not know until in the late 70’s and early 80’s that the controlling interest of the New York banks is held by the same Trustee who have the controlling interest in all the major oil companies such as Standard Oil, which is really the only oil company there is, all the others are just branches and subsidiary area of the original Standard Oil Trust, that was said to have be broken up. It wasn’t, it just changed names moved around a bit and regrouped and is still owned by L.C. Payseurs estate today and is known as Exxon Oil.

The Rockefellers claim they own it but J. D. Rockefeller was just another Trustee in the oil aspect and as well as the banking aspect for the Payseurs.

Its all the same tree.
Control of the Middle East and Third World Countries
The bankers’ banks relied on the greed of the Third World country ministers to mishandle the money because they wanted the Third World countries to go bankrupt. Over the years, that manipulative greed has caused these countries to be in the bankrupt position they are in today.

While the Third World nations were getting their independence from England, France and America, and were setting up their own governments. It’s at that point the bankers of New York loaned them large sums of money which had come to the banks through the Arabs as the result of the high oil prices.
In 1983, it was discovered that a group of very quiet bank-holding companies, formed by the International Bankers, were extending credit wherever they felt like it and under whatever terms they felt like. These bank holding companies were formed so that Chase Manhattan. Chemical Bank and J.P. Morgan couldn’t be held responsible for the Arabs’ money they had been putting into their banks.

Authorized in Regulation Y, Section 225.4 of the U.S. Code to extend such credits, the International Bankers formed holding companies that would, in turn, loan out money to Third World nations knowing that the Third World countries were going to go broke.

After they had destroyed the Shah of Iran and had his country’s money in their banks, they loaned out ridiculous amounts of money, determining that they were going to go broke and letting the bank holding companies hold these loans, and knew what was going to happen when the Third World countries would broke.
These companies were receiving loans from the prime banks in New York. With this money, they were buying foreclosed real property in the form of agricultural property and businesses with liquidation’s, foreclosures and bankruptcies.
The purpose of one holding company was to loan money to the Third World countries from the Arabs money through the New York banks. The second bank holding company was for the purpose of borrowing money from the banks in order to purchase farmland and farms, as well as certain corporations in the U.S. that were making lots of money in this country. Farmland will continue to make money, but now the bankers own and control all of these farms that have gone broke through bank foreclosure schemes.

They plan to own all the land in the united States anyway through the control of railroad land (that can never be sold as the odd sections of land) and they hold the mortgages to all companies and homes that are on even sections of land. Through bank foreclosures and mergers of both solvent and insolvent financial institution they will in the very near future, if they are not stopped, seize every piece of land they don’t already have control of or own.

They not only plan to ultimately control the food supply of the world through seizure of all farms but finally take total control of the people. And they haven’t stopped with the borders of the “united states;” this is a global plan.

The Third World nations are also scheduled for collapse. It appears that their plan for America is to keep cutting these corporations back until one day they just completely shut down, and then they will move the companies to the Third World nations, which they have seized control of through banking and debt, and leave the “united States” to become a Third World nation; it would be really easy to accomplish this.

The farms and businesses which were affected by FDIC and FSLIC foreclosures, are under the direct control of the Federal Reserve Board. It seems that all over America dozens of banks are being bought on a weekly basis. Where did the bankers get the money to buy these banks from? They are being bought with the high oil priced money that goes to the Arabs which are then deposited into the New York banks.

They are buying banks that are intentionally being closed throughout U.S. Some of these banks are still solvent. They are buying the farmlands of America through the farmers who are becoming bankrupt due to the high American dollars in relation to foreign currency. They are doing it all with our own money which pays for gasoline at the pumps, then goes to the Arabs, it is then deposited into the New York banks, where it goes to these holding companies which purchase more American banks that are going under today.

This plan was designed by the Trustees of the banks and railroads that reach from this country around the globe. Around 1983, it was discovered through an emissary from president Marcos of the Philippines and President Suharto and others from Indonesia that they had a severe problem.

Their problem was that having borrowed all the money they had borrowed from the banker in New York, they now needed more money.

“A representative from these banks had just come to them and said they would forgive all of their past loans. They were told that they cannot pay them back, they couldn’t even pay back the interest, and they certainly couldn’t pay back the principal.

They said they wanted to make a bargain, they would forgive our loans (which was the Arabs’ money in reality) and forgive our loans’ principal and interest and that we never have to pay it back, if we did the following.”

1.   Eliminate their own national currencies and become dollar denominated and go to a debit card system instead of a currency system. This would eliminate capital cash altogether.
2.   If they would go to a unilateral centralized credit card system. This was to be a part of their Social Security system and part of their identity system, the debit card, whereby everybody in the country would be synonymous with a credit card number. Their central bank was to act as the wholesaler for debt-based credit which would be extended to it by the new super bank. This was announced by Paul Volker on October 27, 1985.
3.   In order to “help” the economies of those countries, the International Monetary Fund was going to nominate external non domestic corporations to properly engineer, exploit and excavate the Minerals from those countries in return for perpetual royalties. This fits right into the scheme of things, because the resources of minerals in this country is just about depleted due to the mineral land companies that are owned by the railroads have been stripping everything from the land for the past 100 years or more. Now, they have contrived a way to go into the Third World nations and strip their lands for the next 100 or so years. This is why the Royal Family in England owns the Amazon Basin.

Marcos realized what the bankers were trying to do to him; if he gave them (perpetual) rights to all minerals of his country, even though the New York bankers promised they would send in corporations to develop these minerals, that the bankers would get the profits off the minerals, but yet it would “put the people of the Philippines to work”.

Marcos knew that if he gave them this contract of perpetual rights that he was giving up the sovereignty of his country to the New York bankers and the International Monetary Fund.

Marcos, at this point, told them:

“ I will not do this. Get out of my country.”

It was only a matter of weeks before Marcos was deposed of by riots incited by payments of the New York bankers themselves.

Do you see how this works?
If Marcos had agreed to the bankers terms and conditions, they would have had their existing debts forgiven absolutely. New lines of credit were to be extended to them and the new lines of credit were to be under better terms and conditions. When they heard of the word “perpetual” and when they heard the words “totally forgiven, “ they recognized what was happening.

Another group of holding companies was operating with the 403 previous group of holding companies, and they were given monies by the New York bankers. The second group of holding companies were receiving credit from the first group of holding companies to purchase assets and liabilities from the prime banks. The only liabilities the holding companies were holding were the liabilities of the loans made to the Third World nations that could not be repaid and represented by the deposits of the Arab nations.

The only assets they were buying were the assets represented by the loans made to some of the debtor nations. The plan is that the Third World countries default on their payments, (countries like Brazil, Argentina, etc.), so the group of holding companies or the bank holding companies are designed to collapse.
It then became clear, through people in the Trilateral Commission, that the forgiveness, of the Third World debts would eliminate the assets which were being purchased by this second group of holding companies. This left them only with the liabilities that were owed to the Middle East nations, being serviced by the prime banks.

When Third World nations say they can’t pay the bank holding companies, they are saying that they are bankrupt. It’s at this point that the International Bankers will tell the Arabs, that the bank holding companies that were given your money (under those 30 year time deposits of all those billions you have put into the New York banks) over all these years, those bank holding companies just went broke, so as of today, you are bankrupt.
The Arab nations had no idea that these liabilities were now owed by the holding companies and that the debtor nations had stopped paying the prime banks. The Arabs did not understand any of the inter-manipulation of bank finances and world banking. Therefore, they have fallen for this line all of these years, but now within the past few years, the Arabs have become aware of what the bankers have done to them and want to tell the American people what is happening and don’t know how to.

Arrangements were made that the prime banks were to act as servicing agents for the holding companies so that Third World nations would not know that the holding companies were owed the money. The effect of the elimination of assets of the second group of holding companies is threefold. The holding companies would be insolvent (broke) and would legally be able to declare themselves insolvent.

The holding companies would then say to the bankers that they had just lost all of the Arabs’ money.

The New York bankers are legally not responsible for that loss, because they had loaned the Arabs money to the bank’s holding companies. The New York bankers will simply tell the Arabs that they are bankrupt. The New York bankers can legally and legitimately avoid payment to Middle Eastern nations and the Arabs.

The New York bankers had put the Arabs’ money into the bank holding companies which they were not responsible for.

The Middle Easter Arab nations will have to liquidate all their other assets. These assets are represented by U.S. corporate ownership and many billions of dollars worth of U.S. stock and farmlands, plus they have huge holdings on the New York stock exchange!
After the Arabs are declared bankrupt they will start dumping billions of dollars worth of stocks on the New York stock exchange.

Our property, farmland that are already depressed their monetary values will drop to the bottom of the barrel. Real estate everywhere will drop in value by 80 to 85%, and when the value of farmland starts dropping and go from $3,000 per acre to $300 per acre, the farmer will not be able to finance his next crop because he will have no more collateral.

What happens to the people when there is hunger in the streets and the grocery store shelves are bare? Are you beginning to see the scenario for control of the nations and the peoples of the world? People will be killing each other for food.

Is that not World War III, and brother against brother?
The effect of the Saudis and the Kuwaitis and the Middle Eastern people’s sale of even 25% of their total holdings in the U.S. market would be absolutely chaotic in terms of the stock market, real estate and everything else.
The above outline is just one scenario that they have in place and ready to go to crash our monetary system. I do know from inside sources that one plan they have is when all the stocks on the stock exchange drop to $180.00 per share they plan to collapse the market at that time.

So flip a coin, it could be anyone of a dozen scenarios we only know of a few that can all have the same catastrophic effect on the world.

Trusts vs. Anti-Trusts
The bankers possess control through a giant Trust system that was set up in the 1870’s. It took the Payseur family from say 1830 to 1870 to get all the banks corporation etc. at that time set up and running they were organizing monopolies. Then came the rash of Anti-Trust laws which made it illegal for any one else to do what they were doing.

This did away with competition and they had been in the business long enough that the Payseur companies and bank and railroad were grandfathered in and could not be touched. In the 1970’s there was anti-trust legislation passed that abolished all of their past anonymity supposedly if you could ever hope to find out the common ownership of all the banks, railroads and global corporations.

At this time every one of these corporations are in violation of anti-trust because they all have interlocking common interest and a singular ownership. The one that controls the Federal Reserve controls the world, the people on it and your every aspect of life. This is done by the Springs family in North Carolina.

The ones that you will never hear about publicly only the sacrificial lambs are known; the current front is President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.
The Anti-Trust Laws before the mid 1970’s is what allowed such banks as Chase Manhattan, Chemical, J.P. Morgan and other banks in New York to show all time record earnings, while around America literally hundreds of banks (many that are solvent) and farmers as well are going broke?

The reason is that they know that there time table is running out and that the leases to all these banks, railroads and corporation is up on December 31, 1993 because of a merger between Southern Railway and Norfolk Western to form Norfolk Southern Railway.

They are in a race for control.

The banks that are merging now are only merging with themselves.
It is truly a common ownership, one bank with many names, because the Payseurs had a government granted covenant, a monopoly on banks and railroads. The railroads and the banks are owned by one family which was set up on December 15, 1865 as the United States Military Railroad for transportation and communication to run forever.

It was bought by the Payseur family and this included the monopolies that interlocks all these aspects. This family built the systems, corporations, railroad and banks and set up Trustees to operate them and then leased all these out to run on 99 years leases which are up on the above mentioned dates.

The Trustees thought all the Payseurs heirs were dead and they could run away with the whole thing but then found out that if there was not a new tenant of lease set up. All would revert back to the government under the terms of the convenient, so they have now taken control of the government. These Trustees think they have put themselves in a win, win situation.

They never though that we the people would find out what is really going on in the banking world nor who is really running things.

They have been working very hard to get themselves in a position to control the world. For a long time, since about 1925. These catastrophic effects have been designed to throw the American stock market, the American public, corporations, American real estate and people in general, into a state of panic and confusion because you are suppose to lose everything to the New York bankers if you are in debt and do not totally own free and clear land and home. etc..

The plan is that this state of confusion will be greeted with the salvation of the benevolent bankers on three fronts.

According to all of the data that we have gathered and because of the set backs that the bankers have suffered because they just can’t get everything into place fast enough, we know it has been moved 18 months past the planned April 15, 1992, target date for the consolidation of the European Economic Community.

The New York bankers tried again in the late fall of 1992 to seize control of the European Economic Community and failed, that is when our stock market went hay wire again. This is a battle between old European money control and new American money control.

The Americas control is trying to take over the world. It is our belief that if they are not able to seize control of the world monetary system by the end of 1992 that it will possibly be either around December 31, 1993 or June of 1994 based on the Railroad leases that are due to be up at those times and based on the control they each hold.
The bankers want to do away with currency altogether and force the world to go to the Debit Card.

 

 

 

MONEY TRUST INVESTIGATION SUBCOMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON BANKING AND CURRENCY, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, WASHINGTON, D.C., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1912. The subcommittee met at 10:30 o’clock a.m. Present: Messrs. Pujo (chairman, Stephens, Daugherty, Byrnes, Neely, McMorran, Hayes, and Heald. Present also: Samuel Untermyer, Esq., of the New York City, counsel for the committee. TESTIMONY OF MR. J. PIERPONT MORGAN-Continued. THE CHAIRMAN. There being a quorum of the committee present, the committee will be considered in session and the examination of Mr. Morgan will be resumed.

Mr. UNTERMYER. Mr. Morgan, can you give the committee a statement of the total amount of deposits of your banking firm in New York as of the 1st of November, 1912, including all deposits? Mr. MORGAN. I have not got it here, sir. Mr. UNTERMYER. Can you approximate it? Mr. MORGAN. I should think one hundred millions. Mr. UNTERMYER. You have given us a statement of upward of eighty-one millions held by your banking house in New York on behalf of interstate corporations? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. Seventy-three interstate corporations, I believe? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. Would you say, then, that there are only about twenty millions of average deposits outside of those? Mr. MORGAN. I should think there were more than that.

Mr. UNTERMYER. So I supposed. Mr. MORGAN. Say one hundred to one hundred and ten. I can not give the exact figures. Mr. UNTERMYER. Will you furnish those figures to be put in the record? Mr. MORGAN. I will. Mr. UNTERMYER. Does your banking house pay interest on these interstate deposits? Mr. MORGAN. We do, sir. Mr. UNTERMYER. Are you, or is any member of your firm, a director in the corporations that deposit their funds, or a part of their funds, with your banking house in New York? Mr. MORGAN. With some of them. (Pages Missing) Mr. MORAGN. A basis of banking is credit, but not a basis of money. Mr. UNTERMYER. The basis of banking is credit? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. And you know, do you not, that in no part of the world is the supply of gold anything like sufficient to meet the outstanding obligations in the form of notes representing credit? Mr. MORGAN. That is so. Mr. UNTERMYER. That is so, is it not? Mr. MORGAN. Of course. Mr. UNTERMYER. Therefore, when money is issued by a government it is issued largely on the basis of credit, is it not? It has got dollar for dollar of gold to support it, has it? Mr. MORGAN. Well, no; not always.

Mr. UNTERMYER. Is there any country in the world of which the outstanding obligations passing as money are supported dollar for dollar by gold? Mr. MORGAN. It comes nearer to it in England than anywhere else. Mr. UNTERMYER. Does it not come nearer to it here than in England? Mr. MORGAN. I do not know. I can not tell you. Mr. UNTERMYER. You can not tell the proportions? Mr. MORGAN. I can not tell you the proportions. Mr. UNTERMYER. At any rate, it is largely credit there, as it is everywhere, is it not? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. A man or group of men who have the control of credit have control of money, have they not? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. Is not that so? Mr. MORGAN. No, sir; not always. Mr. UNTERMYER. That is generally so, is it not? Mr. MORGAN. No. Mr. UNTERMYER. If you had the control of all the credit and the funds… Mr. MORGAN. Now, the funds—no; leave credit alone. Mr. UNTERMYER. If you had control of all that represents the assets in the banks of New York, would you have the control of money- of all the money? Mr. MORGAN. No; you would not. Mr. UNTERMYER. You would not. Mr. MORGAN. No.

Mr. UNTERMYER. You would not? Mr. MORGAN. No sir; not in my opinion. I may be wrong; but that is my opinion of it. Mr. UNTERMYER. Money is a commodity, is it not? Mr. MORGAN. A very important one. Mr. UNTERMYER. It is a commodity? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. You regard it as regulated by supply and demand, like any other commodity, do you not? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. And you know you can control any other commodity, do you not? Mr. MORGAN. No; I do not think so. Mr. UNTERMYER. Do you not? I thought you said this morning that you could control a commodity, but you could not control money? Mr. MORGAN. I say, you can get a combination that can control business, and all that. Mr. UNTERMYER. A given commodity? Mr. MORGAN. Not a question of a commodity. You can control business; but you can not control money. Mr. UNTERMYER. You can control a given commodity, like steel or wool or some other article of commerce, can you not? I say, can you control it? Mr. MORGAN. Yes; but if you try to control it- take the question of food and all that sort of thing. You could not control that. Mr. UNTERMYER. I am not speaking of food. Mr. MORGAN. That is a commodity.

Mr. UNTERMYER. I say there are commodities that you can control? Mr. MORGAN. Yes, I suppose there are. Mr. UNTERMYER. And it is conceivable that every commodity could be controlled, is it not? Mr. MORGAN. Except money. Mr. UNTERMYER. I say, every commodity except money. Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. And money is a commodity? Mr. MORGAN. I do not like to think of it as a commodity. Mr. UNTERMYER. If a man controlled the credit of a country, he would have control of all of its affairs? Mr. MORGAN. He might have that, but he would not have the money. If he had the credit and I had the money, his customer would be badly off. Mr. UNTERMYER. Yes; I understand that. But is it not conceivable that one man would have the credit and the other the money, is it, because the credit is based upon money? Mr. MORGAN. But money cannot be controlled. Mr. UNTERMYER. Is not the credit based upon money? Mr. MORGAN. No, sir. Mr. UNTERMYER. It has no relation? Mr. MORGAN. No, sir. Mr. UNTERMYER. None whatever? Mr. MORGAN. No, sir, none whatever. Mr. UNTERMYER. So that the banks of New York City would have the same credit, and if you owned them you would have the same control of credit as if you had the money, would you not?

Mr. MORGAN. I know lots of men, business men too, who can borrow any amount, whose credit is unquestioned. Mr. UNTERMYER. Is that not because it is believed that they have the money back of them? Mr. MORGAN. No, sir; it is because people believe in the man. Mr. UNTERMYER. And it is regardless of whether he has any financial backing at all, is it? Mr. MORGAN. It is very often. Mr. UNTERMYER. And he might not be worth anything? Mr. MORGAN. He might not have anything. I have known a man to come into my office, and I have given him a check for a million dollars when I knew he had not a cent in the world. Mr. UNTERMYER. There are not many of them? Mr. MORGAN. Yes; a good many. Mr. UNTERMYER. That is not business? Mr. MORGAN. Yes; unfortunately it is. I do not think it is good business, though. Mr. UNTERMYER. Commercial credits are based upon the possession of money or property? Mr. MORGAN. What? Mr. UNTERMYER. Commercial credits? Mr. MORGAN. Money or property or character. Mr. UNTERMYER. Is not commercial credit based primarily upon money or property? Mr. MORGAN. No, sir; the first thing is character. Mr. UNTERMYER. Before money or property?

Mr. MORGAN. Before money or anything else. Money cannot buy it. Mr. UNTERMYER. So that a man with character, without anything at all behind it, can get all the credit he wants, and a man with the property can not get it? Mr. MORGAN. That is very often the case. Mr. UNTERMYER. But that is the rule of business? Mr. MORGAN. That is the rule of business, sir. Mr. UNTERMYER. If that is the rule of business, Mr. Morgan, why do the banks demand, the first thing they ask, a statement of what the man has got, before they extend him credit? Mr. MORGAN. That is what they go into; but the first thing they say is, “We want to see your record.” Mr. UNTERMYER. Yes; and if his record is a blank, the next thing is how much has he got? Mr. MORGAN. People do not care, then. Mr. UNTERMYER. For instance, if he has got Government bond or railroad bonds, and goes into get credit, he gets it, and on the security of those bonds, does he not? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. He does not get it on his face or his character, does he? Mr. MORGAN. Yes; he gets it on his character. Mr. UNTERMYER. I see; then he might as well take the bonds home, had he not? Mr. MORGAN. Because a man I do not trust could not get money from me on all the bonds in Christendom. Mr. UNTERMYER. That is the rule all over, the world? Mr. MORGAN. I think that is the fundamental basis of business. Mr. UNTERMYER. That is the way money is loaned on Wall Street, on collateral?

Mr. MORGAN. I do not know anything about that. I have nothing to do with it; but that is the principle. Mr. UNTERMYER. You loan money on Wall Street? Mr. MORGAN. Yes; sometimes. Mr. UNTERMYER. You loan it on stock-exchange collateral? Mr. MORGAN. I know who the man is. Mr. UNTERMYER. Do you mean to say that when you send money to loan on the stock exchange you know to whom you loan it? Mr. MORGAN. I may not know before it goes, but I know who he is before very long. Mr. UNTERMYER. I know, but suppose you were lending money on demand loans on stock-exchange collateral? Mr. MORAGN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. You do a lot of that, do you not? Mr.MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. You lean it from day to day on the exchange, do you not? Mr. MORGAN. I used to do it. Mr. UNTERMYER. And you do it now? Mr. MORAGN. Yes; I know. That is all right. Mr. UNTERMYER. You lend it at the loan stand on the exchange? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. And you get certain collateral? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Mr. UNTERMYER. Do you know anything about to whom you lend it?

Mr. MORGAN. I do; at least I always did. Mr. UNTERMYER. Do you mean to say that when people lend, as loans are made on stock-exchange collateral, to the extent of hundreds of millions of dollars, they look to anything except the collateral? Mr. MORGAN. Yes; they do. Mr. UNTERMYER. They do? Mr. MORGAN. Yes. Right on that point, what I did, what I used to do-and I think it is pretty generally done now- is this: If I see there is a loan to Mr. Smith I say, “You call that loan right away.” I would not have that loan in the box. I would not have that loan. Mr. UNTERMYER. That is not the way money is loaned on the stock exchange? Mr. MORGAN. That is the way I loan it. Mr. UNTERMYER. No matter what collateral a man has on the stock exchange— Mr. MORGAN. If he is not satisfactory to me, I call the loan at once, personally. Mr. UNTERMYER. I am not talking about you, personally. Mr. MORGAN. I call that loan personally. I am not talking of anybody else’s way of doing business, but I tell you what I think is the basis of business. Mr. UNTERMYER. I am not asking for your way of doing business, but I am asking for the current way of doing business. I want to know if you really want us to understand that the great mass and volume of loans made on stock-exchange collateral from day to day are not made entirely upon the collaterals? MR. MORGAN. No, sir. Mr. UNTERMYER. You think they are made upon individual responsibility? Mr. MORGAN. No; allow me to say just what I would do. Mr. UNTERMYER. I do not want to know what you do, but I want to know the course of business. Mr. MORGAN. Others do it also; that I know.

 

http://cafr1.com/everwonder.html

Ever wonder what gold the US Government and the Federal Reserve are siting on and where it is?

** The per oz pricing is fixed at $42 per oz and NOT the market price but the quantity is shown and is updated monthly.

http://fms.treas.gov/gold/index.html

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Ever wonder what money the Federal Government brought in and laid out with a detailed look department by department. What the sources of income was and from where?

http://fms.treas.gov/annualreport/index.html

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Want to see the consolidated Annual Financial Report of the US Government and any back issue of the same?

http://fms.treas.gov/fr/index.html

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Hear a lot of talk about “Audit the Federal Reserve”? Well, the Federal Reserve which is a private Association that has a listing of member banks has been audited since 1914 and the audit is signed off on by the US Treasury and GAO (General Accounting Office) each year. So I guess all of this talk about audit the Federal Reserve is NOT to audit the Federal Reserve but a push to audit of the members of the Federal Reserve. Just like the Boy Scouts that is an association and puts out an Annual Financial Report of The Boy Scouts of America. I wonder if we can get legislation passed to audit the million or so members of the Boy Scouts and their families? I guess the talk of “audit the Federal Reserve” has some catchy political value that captures the public’s attention under the current financial condition of the United States. Here is the current audit of the Federal Reserve, their Annual Financial Report and back issues going back to 1914.

http://www.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/rptcongress/default.htm#ar

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Last but not least we have the IRS (Internal Revenue Service). It appears from all views that the IRS is a private collection company given government cooperation and court and private police authority that is  assigned by congress to collect debt from US Taxpayers and then transfer money collected to the US Government. GOA (General Accounting Office) audits the financial statements of the IRS and makes recommendations each year. The IRS is never referred to as an agency of the federal government; a department;  or in any other term that would signify a government body. It is referred to on all occasions as an “entity” http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d10597.pdf   It is also noted that the IRS was not responsible to provide their financial document to the US Government prior to two decades ago. Again no government agency there could do that and operate as a government agency. Additionally the IRS completes two Annual Financial Reports (AFR). One for its debt collection activities for Congress and the other for its internal corporate structure. The first AFR of the IRS for its collection obligations for and to the US Congress can be found and I have the 1999 report linked below. The second AFR of the IRS it appears is kept under lock and key. To date I have not located it. Could the parent company of the IRS actually be established as a corporate “foreign” company? Very possible. They have registered branch offices in every State in the USA but the parent location of the IRS is not shown. The detailed “Corporate” structure of the IRS is listed here – http://www.irs.gov/irm/part1/irm_01-001-021.html 

The 2008 GOA audit of the IRS (first version) – http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09119.pdf

The 1999 GOA audit of the IRS (first version) – http://CAFR1.com/STATES/FEDERAL-GAO-AUDIT-OF-IRS/FED-GAO-AUDIT-OF-IRS-FINANCIAL-STATEMENTS1999.pdf

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Please share these links with all that you know and ask them to do the same (excluding those that can’t get past the TV guide or have a hard time understanding their own checking account statement)

After reviewing then think about the “Political” jargon you are spoon fed and what facts are intentionally omitted from that spoon feeding? It is all about wealth transfer and who and how that wealth transfer is controlled.

The “Boys” did not want you to review these reports and that is why they are never mentioned by the syndicate. But alas, they do have to keep their own records and here they are.

TREASON: “Treason doth never prosper; what’s the reason? For if it prosper, none dare call it treason.” Sir John Harrington, 1561-1612

Sent FYI from,

Walter Burien – CAFR1
P. O. Box 2112
Saint Johns, AZ 85936

Tel. (928) 458-5854

Websites:  http://CAFR1.com  and  http://TaxRetirement.com
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Any local government can be restructured to meet their annual budget needs “Without” taxes. TRF (Tax Retirement Funds) paying for every City, County, State’s annual budgetary needs!
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** AND FOR THOSE RESEARCH ADICTS WHO WANT TO SEE IT ALL**
 “AN OVERKILL OF INFORMATION”

National Monetary Commission

Address by Nelson W. Aldrich before the Economic Club of New York on the work of the National Monetary Commission
United States Government Documents » Documents of the National Monetary Commission

Bank acceptances
United States Government Documents » Documents of the National Monetary Commission

Bank loans and stock exchange speculation
United States Government Documents » Documents of the National Monetary Commission

Bank of France in its relation to national and international credit
United States Government Documents » Documents of the National Monetary Commission

Banking Problems

Banking in Russia, Austro-Hungary, the Netherlands, and Japan
United States Government Documents » Documents of the National Monetary Commission

Banking system of Mexico
United States Government Documents » Documents of the National Monetary Commission

Banks of issue in Italy
United States Government Documents » Documents of the National Monetary Commission

Canadian banking system
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Circulars
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Clearing house methods and practices
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Credit of nations
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Digest of state banking statutes
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Discount system in Europe
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English banking system
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Evolution of credit and banks in France
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Financial diagrams
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First and Second Banks of the United States
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German bank inquiry of 1908
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German bank of inquiry of 1908-9
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German great banks and their concentration in connection with the economic development of Germany
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German imperial banking laws
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History and methods of the Paris Bourse
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History of banking in Canada
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History of crises under the national banking system
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History of the Bank of England, and its financial services to the state
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History of the national bank currency
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Independent treasury of the United States and its relations to the banks of the country
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Interviews on the banking and currency systems of Canada
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Interviews on the banking and currency systems of England, Scotland, France, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy
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Laws of the United States concerning money, banking, and loans – Table of Contents
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Laws of the United States concerning money, banking, and loans
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Letter from the secretary of the National Monetary Commission transmitting, pursuant to law, the report of the Commission
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Miscellaneous articles on German banking
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National Bank of Belgium
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Notes on the postal savings bank systems of the leading countries
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Origin of the national banking system – supplement
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Origin of the national banking system
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Plan of the National Monetary Commission for the revision of our banking and currency laws
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Publications in course of preparation for the National monetary commission
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Reichsbank 1876-1900
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Renewal of Reichsbank Charter
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Report to the National Monetary Commission on the fiscal systems of the United States, England, France, and Germany
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Safety fund banking system in New York, 1829-1866
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Seasonal variations in the relative demand for money and capital in the United States; a statistical study
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Special report from the Banks of the United States
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Special report from the Banks of the United States, Supplement
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State banking before the Civil War
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State banks and trust companies since the passage of the National Bank Act
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Statistics for Great Britain, Germany, and France – Complete publication
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Statistics for Great Britain, Germany, and France – France
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Statistics for Great Britain, Germany, and France – Germany
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Statistics for Great Britain, Germany, and France – Great Britain
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Statistics for the United States, 1867-1909
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Suggested changes in the administrative features of the national banking laws
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Suggested plan for monetary legislation (revised edition)
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Suggested plan for monetary legislation
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Swedish banking system
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Swiss Banking Law
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Tabular summary of the laws, practices, and statistics of the principal banks of the leading countries
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Trade balance of the United States
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Use of credit instruments in payments in the United States
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Federal Reserve Banks » Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis » Statements and Speeches of the Presidents of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis » 1941-1951: Chester C. Davis » 1941: Statements and speeches of Chester C. Davis

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Capital Issues and Municipal Debts and Their Relation to War Financing

Circular No. 1 of the War Finance Corporation

Defense Production Act: Regulation W – Automotive
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Final Report on the Reconstruction Finance Corporation

Reconstruction Finance Corporation Act (Martin Collection)

Reconstruction Finance Corporation Act as amended and provisions of the Emergency Relief and Construction Act of 1932
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Role of Keynesians in wartime policy and postwar planning (Meltzer Collection)

Some phases of financial reconstruction
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War Finance and Inflation
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War and the nation’s financial structure
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War finance and the Federal Reserve Banks
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Banking and Monetary Statistics 1914-1941 : 1914-1941

This publication was designed by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to be a convenient reference source for banking and monetary statistics that previously appeared in the Board’s annual reports and in the monthly Federal Reserve Bulletin. The statistics included relate primarily to the operations of the Federal Reserve System, but also include data on the condition and operation of all banks. There are also statistics on nonbank financial institutions, currency, money rates, securities markets, Treasury finance, consumer credit, gold, and international financial developments.

SUDOC: FR 1.2:B 22/5
OCLC: 2823516
Authors: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.)
Related Publications: Annual Statistical Digest
Banking and Monetary Statistics 1941-1970
Supplement to Banking & Monetary Statistics

Available Files

Subject Listing for Issue 1914-1941

In some instances, pages are assembled into collections with pages of the same title that appear in later issues of the publication. Pages may be retrieved either for a specific year or in a collection.

Assets (Accounting)

All Insured Commercial Banks – Classification of Deposits, June and December, 1934-1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Classification of Investments by Maturities and by Class of Bank, December 31, 1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Classification of Loans and Investments, June and December, 1934-1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, by States, December 31, 1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1934-1941

All Member Banks – Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

All Member Banks–Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

All Member Banks – Classification of Loans and Investments, by Class of Bank, on June 30 Call Dates, 1919-1928

All Member Banks–Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

All Member Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1914-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-1941

Country Member Banks – Classification of Deposits on Call Dates 1928-1941

Country Member Banks – Classification of Investments on Call Dates 1928-1941

Country Member Banks -Classification of Loans on Call Dates 1928-1941

Country Member Banks -Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-194

Insured Commercial Bank Earnings, Expenses, and Dividends, 1934-1941

Insured Commercial Bank Earnings, Expenses, and Dividends, by Total Deposits of banks 1941

Insured Mutual Savings Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1934-1941

Insured Nonmember Commercial Banks – Classification of Deposits; June and December, 1934-1941

Insured Nonmember Commercial Banks – Classification of Loans and Investments, June and December, 1934-1941

Insured Nonmember Commercial Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1934-1941

Member Bank Earnings, Expenses, and Dividends, 1919-1941

Member Bank Earnings, Expenses, and Dividends, by Class of Bank, 1939, 1940, and 1941

Member Bank Earnings, Expenses, and Dividends, by Class of Bank and by Federal Reserve Districts, 1941

Member Bank Earnings Ratios, 1919-1941

Member Bank Earnings Ratios, by Class of Bank, 1939, 1940, and 1941

Member Bank Earnings Ratios, by Class of Bank and by Federal Reserve Districts, 1941

Member Bank Earnings Ratios, by Total Deposits of Banks and by Ratio of Time to Total Deposits, 1941

National-Bank Earnings and Earnings Ratios, 1869-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-1941

Text – Assets and Liabilities of All Member Banks

Text – Assets and Liabilities of Insured Banks

Text – Assets and Liabilities of Weekly Reporting Member Banks in Leading Cities

Text – Bank Earnings

Weekly Reporting Member Banks in 101 Leading Cities-Principal Assets and Liabilities, Weekly and Monthly, 1919-1941

Weekly reporting Member Banks in New York City–Principal Assets and Liabilities, Weekly and Monthly, 1919-1941

Weekly reporting Member Banks outside New York City–Principal Assets and Liabilities, Weekly and Monthly, 1919-1941

Bank deposits

Bank Debits and Deposit Turnover, Excluding Interbank Deposits and Collection Items, at all Commercial Banks, Yearly, 1919-1941

Bank Debits to Demand Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank and United States Government, Accounts, at Weekly Reporting Member Banks, Weekly, 1935-1941

Bank Debits to Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank Accounts, by Federal Reserve Districts, and by Reporting Centers, Yearly, 1919-1941

Bank Debits to Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank Accounts, by Federal Reserve Districts, Yearly 1919-1941

Bank Debits to Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank Accounts, Monthly, 1919-1941

Text – Bank Debits and Deposit Turnover

Banking market

Banks on par list and not on par list -Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank and by Federal Reserve Districts and by States, December 31, 1939

Banks on par list and not on par list -Number, by Class of Bank and by States, December 31, 1941

Banks on par list and not on par list- Number, by Federal Reserve Districts and by Class of Bank, 1916-1941

Changes in the Number of Incorporated Commercial Banks, by Class of Bank and by Character of Change, 1921-1941

Commercial Bank Suspensions -Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank, 1892-1941

Commercial Bank Suspensions -Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Deposits and Currency – Adjusted Deposits of all Banks and Currency Outside Banks, 1892-1941

Deposits of Member Banks in Larger and Smaller Places, Monthly, 1936-1941

Mutual Savings Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

National-Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Nonmember Bank Suspensions (Other Than Private and Mutual Savings Banks) – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Number and Deposits of Commercial Banks, by Amount of Deposits and by Class of Bank, by States, June 30, 1941

Number of Commercial Banks, by Population of Place in which Located and by Amount of Deposits, by Class of Bank, June 30, 1941

Principal Assets and Liabilities of Banks, by Population of Place in which Located, June and December; Member Banks, 1929-1941; Insured Banks, 1934-1941

Private (Unincorporated) Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

State Member Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Text – Bank Suspensions

Bank liabilities

All Insured Commercial Banks – Classification of Deposits, June and December, 1934-1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Classification of Investments by Maturities and by Class of Bank, December 31, 1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Classification of Loans and Investments, June and December, 1934-1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, by States, December 31, 1941

All Insured Commercial Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1934-1941

All Member Banks – Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

All Member Banks–Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

All Member Banks – Classification of Loans and Investments, by Class of Bank, on June 30 Call Dates, 1919-1928

All Member Banks–Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

All Member Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1914-1941

Bank Debits and Deposit Turnover, Excluding Interbank Deposits and Collection Items, at all Commercial Banks, Yearly, 1919-1941

Bank Debits to Demand Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank and United States Government, Accounts, at Weekly Reporting Member Banks, Weekly, 1935-1941

Bank Debits to Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank Accounts, by Federal Reserve Districts, and by Reporting Centers, Yearly, 1919-1941

Bank Debits to Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank Accounts, by Federal Reserve Districts, Yearly 1919-1941

Bank Debits to Deposit Accounts, Except Interbank Accounts, Monthly, 1919-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in Chicago–Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Central Reserve City Member Banks in New York City–Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-1941

Country Member Banks – Classification of Deposits on Call Dates 1928-1941

Country Member Banks – Classification of Investments on Call Dates 1928-1941

Country Member Banks -Classification of Loans on Call Dates 1928-1941

Country Member Banks -Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-194

Insured Mutual Savings Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1934-1941

Insured Nonmember Commercial Banks – Classification of Deposits; June and December, 1934-1941

Insured Nonmember Commercial Banks – Classification of Loans and Investments, June and December, 1934-1941

Insured Nonmember Commercial Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1934-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Classification of Deposits on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Classification of Investments on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Classification of Loans on Call Dates, 1928-1941

Reserve City Member Banks – Principal Assets and Liabilities on Call Dates, 1919-1941

Text – Assets and Liabilities of All Member Banks

Text – Assets and Liabilities of Insured Banks

Text – Assets and Liabilities of Weekly Reporting Member Banks in Leading Cities

Text – Bank Debits and Deposit Turnover

Weekly Reporting Member Banks in 101 Leading Cities-Principal Assets and Liabilities, Weekly and Monthly, 1919-1941

Weekly reporting Member Banks in New York City–Principal Assets and Liabilities, Weekly and Monthly, 1919-1941

Weekly reporting Member Banks outside New York City–Principal Assets and Liabilities, Weekly and Monthly, 1919-1941

Bank reserves

Changes in Central Reserve and Reserve City Designations, 1914-1941

Member Bank Borrowings at Federal Reserve Banks, by Selected Groups of Banks, Monthly 1919-1934

Member bank reserve balances, required reserves, excess reserves, and borrowings, by class of bank, monthly, 1929-1941

Member bank reserve requirements, June 21, 1917-December 31, 1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, annual averages of daily figures, 1914-1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, call dates, 1914-1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, end of month figures, 1914-1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, monthly averages of daily figures, August 1917-December 1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, Wednesday figures, 1922-1941

Text – Member Bank Reserve, Reserve Bank Credit, and Related Items

Banks and banking

All banks – Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank, 1914-1941

All Banks – Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank and by States, Selected Years, 1914-1941

All Banks – Number, Loans, Investments, and Deposits, 1914-1941

All Commercial Banks – Number, Loans, Investments, and Deposits, 1914-1941

Banks on par list and not on par list -Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank and by Federal Reserve Districts and by States, December 31, 1939

Banks on par list and not on par list -Number, by Class of Bank and by States, December 31, 1941

Banks on par list and not on par list- Number, by Federal Reserve Districts and by Class of Bank, 1916-1941

Branches of Member Banks Classified by Amount and Character of Assets and Liabilities, June 30, 1940

Changes in the Number of Incorporated Commercial Banks, by Class of Bank and by Character of Change, 1921-1941

Commercial Banks Operating Branches and Their Branches, by States, December 31, 1939–Number and Deposits, by Cass of Bank and by Geographic Extent of Branch Banking

Commercial Banks Operating Branches and Their Branches, by States, December 31, 1941- Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank and by Geographic Extent of Branch Banking

Commercial Banks Operating Branches and Their Branches, by States, Selected Years, 1900-1941-Number, by Class of Bank

Commercial Banks Operating Branches and Their Branches, December 31, 1939-Selected Classification of Number and Deposits

Commercial Banks Operating Branches and Their Branches, Selected Years, 1900-1941- Number, and Loans and Investments or Deposits, by Cass of Bank

Commercial Bank Suspensions -Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank, 1892-1941

Commercial Bank Suspensions -Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Deposits and Currency – Adjusted Deposits of all Banks and Currency Outside Banks, 1892-1941

Deposits of Member Banks in Larger and Smaller Places, Monthly, 1936-1941

Group and chain banking, by States, December 31, 1929–number and loans and investments, by class of bank

Group and chain banking, by States, December 31, 1931–number and loans and investments, by class of bank

Group and chain banking, by States, December 31, 1939–number and deposits, by class of bank

Group and chain banking, by States, December 31, 1941–number and deposits, by class of bank

Group and chain banking, December 31,’ 1939–selected classifications of number and deposits

Mutual Savings and Private Banks Operating Branches and Their Branches, by States, December 31, 1935, 1939, and 1941-Number and Deposits

Mutual Savings Bank – Number, Loans, Investments, and Deposits, 1914-1941

Mutual Savings Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

National Banks – Number, Loans, Investments, Bankers’ Balances, and Deposits, 1863-1941

National-Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Nonmember Bank Suspensions (Other Than Private and Mutual Savings Banks) – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Nonmember Commercial Banks – Number, Loans, Investments, and Deposits, 1914-1941

Number and Deposits of Commercial Banks, by Amount of Deposits and by Class of Bank, by States, June 30, 1941

Number of Commercial Banks, by Population of Place in which Located and by Amount of Deposits, by Class of Bank, June 30, 1941

Principal Assets and Liabilities of Banks, by Population of Place in which Located, June and December; Member Banks, 1929-1941; Insured Banks, 1934-1941

Private (Unincorporated) Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

State Member Banks – Number, Loans, Investments, Bankers’ Balances, and Deposits, 1915-1941

State Member Bank Suspensions – Number and Deposits, by States, 1921-1941

Text – Bank Suspensions

Text – Branch, Group, and Chain Banking

Text – General Statistics of All Banks in The United States

Banks and banking, Central

Assets and liabilities of each Federal Reserve Bank, December 3], 1920, 1929, 1933, and 1941

Assets and liabilities of Federal Reserve Banks, December 31, 1914-1941

Bills Bought, by Class of Paper and by Method of Purchase -Holdings by Federal Reserve Banks, June and December, 1921-1937, and by Each Federal Reserve Bank, December 1921 and 1929

Bills Discounted, by Class of Paper -Holdings by Federal Reserve Banks, June and December, 1917-1937, and by Each Federal Reserve Bank, December, 1920, 1929, and 1933

Changes in Central Reserve and Reserve City Designations, 1914-1941

Current Earnings, Net Earnings, and Disposition of Net Earnings of Federal Reserve Banks, 1914-1941

Deposits, note circulation, reserves, and reserve percentages of Federal Reserve Banks, monthly, November 1914-December 1941

Detailed Statement of Earnings and Expenses of Each Federal Reserve Bank, 1941

Federal Reserve Bank Buying Rates on Prime Bankers’ Acceptances, 1919-1941

Federal Reserve Bank Discount Rates on Advances Under Section 10 (b) of the Federal Reserve Act, February 27, 1932-December 31, 1941

Federal Reserve Bank Discount Rates on Eligible Paper, Monthly, November 1914-December 1941

Federal Reserve Bank Rates on Industrial Advances and Commitments, July 10, 1934-December 31, 1941

Federal Reserve Notes -Statement of Amounts Issued and Collateral, by Each Federal Reserve Bank, December 31, 1920, 1929, 1933, and 1941

Federal Reserve Notes – Statement of Amounts Issued and Collateral, December 31, 1914-1941

Holdings of United States Government Securities, Direct and Guaranteed, by Federal Reserve Banks, 1914-1941

Industrial advances and commitments, June and December, 1934-1941

Maturity Distribution of Bills held, by Federal Reserve Banks, June and December, 1914-1941

Maximum Rates on Time Deposits at Member Banks, November 1, 1933-December 31, 1941

Member Bank Borrowings at Federal Reserve Banks, by Selected Groups of Banks, Monthly 1919-1934

Member bank reserve balances, required reserves, excess reserves, and borrowings, by class of bank, monthly, 1929-1941

Member bank reserve requirements, June 21, 1917-December 31, 1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, annual averages of daily figures, 1914-1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, call dates, 1914-1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, end of month figures, 1914-1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, monthly averages of daily figures, August 1917-December 1941

Member bank reserves, reserve bank credit, and related items, Wednesday figures, 1922-1941

Principal Assets and Liabilities of Each Federal Reserve Bank, December 31, 1914-1941

Text – Federal Reserve Banks

Text – Member Bank Reserve, Reserve Bank Credit, and Related Items

Volume of Operations in Principal Departments of each Federal Reserve Bank

Volume of Operations in Principal Departments of Federal Reserve Banks

Banks and banking, International

Bank of Canada – Principal Assets and Liabilities, Monthly, 1935-1941

Bank of England – Principal Assets and Liabilities, Yearly, 1914-1927; Monthly, 1928-1941

Bank of France – Principal Assets and Liabilities, Yearly, 1915-1927; Monthly, 1928-1941

Commercial Banks in Canada – Principal Assets and Liabilities, Monthly, 1930-1941

Commercial Banks in France – Principal Assets and Liabilities, Monthly, 1930-1941

Commercial Banks in Germany – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and November, 1930-1933; Monthly, 1934-1941

Commercial Banks in United Kingdom – Principal Assets and liabilities, Monthly, 1930-1941

Money rates in selected foreign countries, monthly, 1924-1941

Reichsbank – Principal Assets and Liabilities, Monthly, 1924-1941

Finance

General Fund of the Treasury, June, 1916-1917; June and December, 1918-1933; monthly, 1934-1941

Postal Savings System – Assets and Depositors’ Balances, June and December, 1911-1941

Postal Savings System – Depositors’ Balances, Monthly, 1927-1941

Summary of Treasury receipts, expenditures, and related items, fiscal years, 1916-1941; monthly, 1934-1941

Text – United States Government–Treasury Finance and Government Corporations and Credit Agencies

United States Government Corporations and Credit Agencies – Principal Assets and Liabilities, by Corporations and Agencies, December 31, 1940 and 1941

United States Government Corporations and Credit Agencies – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1935-1937; monthly June 1938-December 1941

United States Government Debt – Maturities of Marketable Public Direct Securities, June, 1916-1935; June and December 1936-1941

United States Government Debt – Ownership of Direct and Guaranteed Securities, June, 1916-1935; June and December, 1936-1941

United States Government Debt – Volume and kind of Direct Securities, June and December, 1916-1932; monthly, 1933-1941

United States Government Debt – Volume of fully Guaranteed Securities, by Issuing Agencies, monthly, October 1933-December 1941

Finance, Public

General Fund of the Treasury, June, 1916-1917; June and December, 1918-1933; monthly, 1934-1941

Postal Savings System – Assets and Depositors’ Balances, June and December, 1911-1941

Postal Savings System – Depositors’ Balances, Monthly, 1927-1941

Summary of Treasury receipts, expenditures, and related items, fiscal years, 1916-1941; monthly, 1934-1941

Text – United States Government–Treasury Finance and Government Corporations and Credit Agencies

United States Government Corporations and Credit Agencies – Principal Assets and Liabilities, by Corporations and Agencies, December 31, 1940 and 1941

United States Government Corporations and Credit Agencies – Principal Assets and Liabilities, June and December, 1935-1937; monthly June 1938-December 1941

United States Government Debt – Maturities of Marketable Public Direct Securities, June, 1916-1935; June and December 1936-1941

United States Government Debt – Ownership of Direct and Guaranteed Securities, June, 1916-1935; June and December, 1936-1941

United States Government Debt – Volume and kind of Direct Securities, June and December, 1916-1932; monthly, 1933-1941

United States Government Debt – Volume of fully Guaranteed Securities, by Issuing Agencies, monthly, October 1933-December 1941

Financial markets

Brokers’ Borrowings on Collateral in New York City as Reported by Members of the New York Stock Exchange, Monthly, September 1918-November 1922 and 1926-1941

Brokers’ Loans by Groups of Lenders, Quarterly, September 1918-December 1932; Call Dates, 1933-1938

Detailed Debit and Credit Balances and Related Items of Member Firms of the New York Stock Exchange Carrying Margin Accounts, June and December, 1935-1941

Loans to Brokers and Dealers Secured, by Stocks and Bonds Made, by Weekly Reporting Member Banks in New York City, Weekly, 1926-1935

Margin Requirements, October 1, 1934-December 31, 1941

Street Loans Made by Daily Reporting Banks in New York City, Weekly, October 1917-January 1926

Foreign exchange

Foreign exchange rates, by countries, monthly

Gold

Analysis of Changes in Gold Stock of United States, Monthly, 1914-1941

Gold inflow to the United States and contributing factors, 1914-1940

Gold Production, by Countries and Areas, 1910-1941

Gold Reserves of Central Banks and Governments, by Countries, December, 1913-1927; Monthly, June 1928-December 1941

Net Gold Imports to the United States, by Countries, 1915-1941

Text – Gold

Interest rates

Commercial Paper and Bankers’ Acceptances Outstanding, Monthly, December 1924-December 1941

Commercial paper outstanding, monthly, July 1918-December 1924

Federal Reserve Bank Buying Rates on Prime Bankers’ Acceptances, 1919-1941

Federal Reserve Bank Discount Rates on Advances Under Section 10 (b) of the Federal Reserve Act, February 27, 1932-December 31, 1941

Federal Reserve Bank Discount Rates on Eligible Paper, Monthly, November 1914-December 1941

Federal Reserve Bank Rates on Industrial Advances and Commitments, July 10, 1934-December 31, 1941

Maximum Rates on Time Deposits at Member Banks, November 1, 1933-December 31, 1941

Rates Charged on Commercial Loans, by Banks in Principal Cities, Monthly, January 1928-February 1939; Quarterly, 1939-1941

Rates Charged on Customers’ Loans, by Banks in Principal Cities, Monthly, 1919-1929

Short-Term Open-Market Rates in New York City, Monthly, 1890-1941

Short-Term Open-Market Rates in New York City, Weekly, 1919-1941

Text – Money Rates and Securities Markets

Yields on Short-Term United States Government Securities, Monthly

Yields on Short-Term United States Government Securities, Weekly

International finance

International capital position of the United States, 1937-1940

Net Capital Movement to United States, Weekly, Cumulative from January 2, 1935 to December 31, 1941

Short-Term Foreign Liabilities and Assets Reported, by Banks in the United States, by Countries, Monthly, May 1929-June 1931; weekly, July1931- December 1941

Text – International Financial Statistics

Money

Currency in Circulation Before and After Adjustment for Seasonal Variation, Monthly, 1919-1941

Currency in Circulation by Kind, 1860-1941

Currency in Circulation By Kind, Monthly, 1914-1941

Currency in Circulation Paper Money by Denominations and Coin, Monthly, October 1930-December 1941

Shipments and Receipts of United States Paper Currency to and from Europe, 1923-1941

Text – Currency

Treasury currency outstanding, by kind, monthly, 1919-1941

Money market

Commercial Paper and Bankers’ Acceptances Outstanding, Monthly, December 1924-December 1941

Commercial paper outstanding, monthly, July 1918-December 1924

Rates Charged on Commercial Loans, by Banks in Principal Cities, Monthly, January 1928-February 1939; Quarterly, 1939-1941

Rates Charged on Customers’ Loans, by Banks in Principal Cities, Monthly, 1919-1929

Short-Term Open-Market Rates in New York City, Monthly, 1890-1941

Short-Term Open-Market Rates in New York City, Weekly, 1919-1941

Yields on Short-Term United States Government Securities, Monthly

Yields on Short-Term United States Government Securities, Weekly

Money supply

Banks on par list and not on par list -Number and Deposits, by Class of Bank and by Federal Reserve Districts and by States, December 31, 1939

Banks on par list and not on par list -Number, by Class of Bank and by States, December 31, 1941

Banks on par list and not on par list- Number, by Federal Reserve Districts and by Class of Bank, 1916-1941

Changes in the Number of Incorporated Commercial Banks, by Class of Bank and by Character of Change, 1921-1941

Deposits and Currency – Adjusted Deposits of all Banks and Currency Outside Banks, 1892-1941

Deposits of Member Banks in Larger and Smaller Places, Monthly, 1936-1941

Number and Deposits of Commercial Banks, by Amount of Deposits and by Class of Bank, by States, June 30, 1941

Number of Commercial Banks, by Population of Place in which Located and by Amount of Deposits, by Class of Bank, June 30, 1941

Principal Assets and Liabilities of Banks, by Population of Place in which Located, June and December; Member Banks, 1929-1941; Insured Banks, 1934-1941

Securities

Basic Yields of Corporate Bonds, by Term to Maturity, 1900-1942

Bond prices, by type of security, monthly, 1919-1941

Bond yields, by type of security, monthly, 1919-1941

Bond yields, by type of security, weekly, 1934-1941

Common stock prices, weekly, 1934-1941

New Corporate Security Issues, by Proposed uses of Proceeds and by Major Groups of Issuers, Monthly 1934-1941

New Security Issues, by Major Groups of Issuers, Monthly, 1919-1941

Principal Debit and Credit Balances of Member Firms of the New York Stock Exchange Carrying Margin Accounts, Monthly, November 1931-December 1941

Stock Prices, Monthly, 1900-1941

Text – Money Rates and Securities Markets

Trading in stocks on New York Stock Exchange, monthly, 1900-1941

Trading in stocks on New York Stock Exchange, weekly, 1934-1941

Yields of High-Grade Railroad Bonds, Monthly

Statistics

Commercial Paper and Bankers’ Acceptances Outstanding, Monthly, December 1924-December 1941

Commercial paper outstanding, monthly, July 1918-December 1924

Rates Charged on Commercial Loans, by Banks in Principal Cities, Monthly, January 1928-February 1939; Quarterly, 1939-1941

Rates Charged on Customers’ Loans, by Banks in Principal Cities, Monthly, 1919-1929

Short-Term Open-Market Rates in New York City, Monthly, 1890-1941

Short-Term Open-Market Rates in New York City, Weekly, 1919-1941

Text – General Statistics of All Banks in The United States

Yields on Short-Term United States Government Securities, Monthly

Yields on Short-Term United States Government Securities, Weekly

Banking Reform Act of 1971 : April 20-May 4, 1971

Hearings before the Committee on Banking and Currency, House of Representatives, ninety-second Congress, first session, on:
H.R. 5700 (the Banking Reform Act of 1971): a bill to prohibit certain conflicts of interest and encourage competition in the banking industry and related fields to provide for restrictions and disclosures with respect to certain loans, to prohibit brokered deposits in banks and other financial institutions, to prohibit the use of giveaways in the solicitation of deposits, to permit full deposit insurance for government depositors, and for other purposes.
H.R. 3287: a bill to prohibit federally insured banks from making loans to provide for the purchase of bank stock, and for other purposes.
and H.R. 7440: a bill to clarify the authority of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board to regulate conflicts of interest in the operation of insured savings and loan associations, and for other purposes.

The Banking Reform Act of 1971 sought to enhance competition among financial institutions, reduce concentrations of economic power within the financial community, and eliminate certain serious conflict-of-interest situations occurring as a result of existing practices carried on by financial institutions.

These hearings took place from April 20 – May 4, 1971. Included are statements from such individuals as Arthur Burns, Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System; William Camp, Comptroller of the Currency; Preston Martin, Chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board; Richard Smith, Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission; and Frank Wille, Chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

SUDOC: Y 4.B22/1:B22/22/971
OCLC: 157948
Authors: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Banking and Currency

Available Files

Publications

50th Anniversary Publication
This pamphlet, published in 1964, briefly documents the early history of the 2nd District Bank of the Federal Reserve System.

75 Years of American Finance
A graphic presentation of American financial history from 1861 through 1938. It was published as a continuous timeline over 85 feet long.

Summary of files: The index below provides a guide to the chart by subject and by year, and gives an overview of the breadth of information in the timeline. The complete publication is a pdf containing pages of individual years to allow you to print a particular year or range of years. The topics of interest were provided by the author, possibly as a teaching aid. Finally, the graphic presentation provides the ability to scroll through the document with three years continually displayed and enables you to jump to specific years.

ABC of the Federal Reserve System
Subtitle: Why the Federal Reserve System was called into being, the main features of its organization, and how it works.

The author was a professor of economics at Princeton, and a firm advocate of the gold standard. Between 1922 and 1933, he served as an adviser to foreign governments, helping them establish and maintain strong currencies. His papers are available if you would like to know more about him and his career.

Activities and Policies of District Banks and their Implications for Monetary Policy
Hearing before the Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy of the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-seventh Congress, second session, September 23, 1982.

Addresses at a Luncheon Given by the Subcommittee on Capital Issues
Addresses delivered by James H. Beal, Mr. D.C. Wills, and Dr. J.T. Holdsworth at a luncheon given by the Subcommittee on Capital Issues, William Penn Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

All Bank Statistics 1896 – 1955
The publication is a useful statistical history of banking developments in the United States and provides a reliable basis for relating banking and monetary forces to changing levels of economic activity. Included are annual balance sheet items, particularly on a standard basis (segregation of loans into real estate, collateral, and other loans), as well as data on hundreds of unincorporated (private) banks. Data is provided for both States and for major bank categories.

Amendments of the Bretton Woods Agreements Act
Hearing before the Subcommittee on International Finance of the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs of the United States Senate, 94th Congress, 2nd Session, on H.R. 13955, to provide for amendment of the Bretton Woods Agreements Act, and for other purposes.

Annual Report of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
This report details the operations of the Federal Reserve Board during the course of the year. It provides information about the Federal Open Market Committee meetings, regulatory activities, financial status of the different Reserve Banks, and information on services provided by the Banks, as well as statistical tables detailing the condition and activities of the Federal Reserve System. The Report has been published annually since 1914.

Annual Report of the Comptroller of the Currency
The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) is a bureau of the United States Department of the Treasury. Annually since its establishment in 1983, the OCC has reported to Congress and the public the status of the national banks chartered, regulated, and supervised.

Annual Report of the Department of the Treasury

Annual Report of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Annual Reports (some years are referred to as Annual Statements) of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Annual Reports for the years 1988 to present are available at http://www.frbatlanta.org/pubs/annualreport/.

Annual Report of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Annual Reports for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. Annual Reports for the years 1995 to current are available at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/ar/pastissues.cfm (Annual Report – Past Issues). NOTE: No annual reports were written or distributed for the years 1953 through 1978.

Annual Statistical Digest
The Annual Statistical Digest was designed to provide a single source of historical continuations of statistics carried regularly in the Federal Reserve Bulletin. It is of particular interest to those interested in economic and financial data, including interest rates, monetary aggregates, banking deposits and reserves, as well as historical mortgage rates, and production information.
The final 1996-2000 issue was published under the title Statistical Digest. The reports are continued in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for the years 2001-2003, and in the Statistical Supplement to the Federal Reserve Bulletin for 2004-2008.

Arab Boycott
Hearings before the Subcommittee on International Finance of the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-fifth Congress, first session, on S.69 (to amend and extend the Export Administration Act) and S.92 (to amend and extend the Export Administration Act of 1969 to improve the administration of export controls pursuant to such act, to strengthen the antiboycott provisions of such act, and for other purposes). These hearings took place on February 21, 22 and 28, and March 15, 1977.

Banking and Monetary Statistics 1914-1941
This publication was designed by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to be a convenient reference source for banking and monetary statistics that previously appeared in the Board’s annual reports and in the monthly Federal Reserve Bulletin. The statistics included relate primarily to the operations of the Federal Reserve System, but also include data on the condition and operation of all banks. There are also statistics on nonbank financial institutions, currency, money rates, securities markets, Treasury finance, consumer credit, gold, and international financial developments.

Banking and Monetary Statistics 1941-1970
This publication was designed by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to be a convenient reference source for banking and monetary statistics that previously appeared in the Board’s annual reports and in the monthly Federal Reserve Bulletin. The statistics included relate primarily to the operations of the Federal Reserve System, but also include data on the condition and operation of all banks. There are also statistics on nonbank financial institutions, currency, money rates, securities markets, Treasury finance, consumer credit, gold, and international financial developments.

Banking Problems
Vol. 36, No. 3, of The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Originally digitized as part of the Google Books project.

Banking Reform
J. Laurence Laughlin served as the editor for this book, which was published in 1912 by the National Citizens’ League for the Promotion of Sound Banking. Professor Laughlin was an economist, teacher, and writer. He prepared the final report of the Indianapolis Monetary Commission in 1898, testified at the Money Trust Investigation (Pujo Committee) hearings of 1912-1913, and published several books and articles on the Federal Reserve System.

Banking Reform Act of 1971
Hearings before the Committee on Banking and Currency, House of Representatives, ninety-second Congress, first session, on:
H.R. 5700 (the Banking Reform Act of 1971): a bill to prohibit certain conflicts of interest and encourage competition in the banking industry and related fields to provide for restrictions and disclosures with respect to certain loans, to prohibit brokered deposits in banks and other financial institutions, to prohibit the use of giveaways in the solicitation of deposits, to permit full deposit insurance for government depositors, and for other purposes.
H.R. 3287: a bill to prohibit federally insured banks from making loans to provide for the purchase of bank stock, and for other purposes.
and H.R. 7440: a bill to clarify the authority of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board to regulate conflicts of interest in the operation of insured savings and loan associations, and for other purposes.

The Banking Reform Act of 1971 sought to enhance competition among financial institutions, reduce concentrations of economic power within the financial community, and eliminate certain serious conflict-of-interest situations occurring as a result of existing practices carried on by financial institutions.

These hearings took place from April 20 – May 4, 1971. Included are statements from such individuals as Arthur Burns, Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System; William Camp, Comptroller of the Currency; Preston Martin, Chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board; Richard Smith, Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission; and Frank Wille, Chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

Booms and Depressions: Some First Principles
Irving Fisher (1867-1947) was an early practitioner of mathematical economics. Departing from his primary interest in theories of interest rates, capital, and investments, this work is an early foray into analysis of business cycles, and the expression of his debt-deflation theory. In it he identifies nine main factors influencing depressions, provides empirical observations of those factors, and makes suggestions for remedial actions. It is an elaboration of the author’s address at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, held at New Orleans, Jan. 1, 1932.

Brief History of Panics and Their Periodical Occurrence in the United States
Translation of Des crises commerciales et de leur rétour périodique en France, en Angleterre et aux États-Unis, which covers financial panic in the United States from 1889-1916.
Originally digitized as part of the Google Books Project.

Briefing on Operation Independence
Hearing before the Subcommittee on International Trade, Investment and Monetary Policy of the Committee on Banking, Currency and Housing, House of Representatives, Ninety-fourth Congress, first session, for the purpose of having an informal briefing by the Federal Energy Administration. This hearing took place on March 12, 1975.

Budget of the United States Government
The Budget of the United States Government is a collection documents and supporting data that contain the budget message of the President. Included are information about the President’s budgetary proposals for a given fiscal year. The report is produced annually. Prior to 1971, the report was prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. From 1972 it has been prepared by the Office of Management and Budget, with some prepared in conjunction with the Executive Office of the President.

Budget of the United States Government – Special Analyses
This publication presents information on special aspects of the President’s budgetary recommendations transmitted in the annual Budget of the United States Government. Volumes for the years up through fiscal year 1971 were published under the title Special Analyses, Budget of the United States; the years 1972-1990 were published under the title Special Analyses, Budget of the United States Government.

Business Booms and Depressions since 1775 [Chart]
A chart of the past trend of price inflation, federal debt, business, national income, stocks and bond yields for the United States from 1775 to 1943.

Business Conditions Digest
Business Conditions Digest (continues Business Cycle Developments) is a monthly publication of economic time series covering such data as construction contracts and orders, new building permits, employment rates, and price indices in convenient and easy-to-interpret graphical format showing peaks, troughs, and recessions. The publication is a product of the U.S. Department of Commerce. This publication was discontinued with the March 1990 issue, with business cycle indicators to be included in a new section of the Survey of Current Business, beginning with the April 1990 issue.

Business Cycle Developments
Business Cycle Developments was a monthly publication of economic time series covering such data as construction contracts and orders, new building permits, employment rates, and price indices in convenient and easy-to-interpret graphical format. Graphs show peaks, troughs, and recessions. Tables are also included showing data used in the graphs. The publication was a product of the U.S. Department of Commerce. (Continued by Business Conditions Digest)

Business Cycles
This book presents an analytical description of the processes by which business cycles occur, through the use of market reports and statistics concerning business cycles from 1890 to the time of the book’s publication (1913) in the United States, England, Germany, and France.
Published as Volume 3 of the Memoirs of the University of California.

Capital Issues and Municipal Debts and Their Relation to War Financing
Read at the National Conference on War Economy, June 6, 1918, and published in Proceedings of the Academy of Political Science, Vol. VIII, Number I, July 1918.

Capital Issues Committee of the Federal Reserve Board
An address by Frederic H. Curtiss, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Capital Issues, before the City Treasures and Collectors Association of Massachusetts at Boston, March 23, 1918

Capital Issues Committee: Rules and Regulations
The Law and Circular No. One of the Capital Issues Committee, created by the War Finance Corporation Act.

Causes of the Present Depression and Possible Remedies
Winthrop W. Aldrich, chairman of the board and president of Chase National Bank from 1930 to 1953, was invited to speak on the Depression before the Finance Committee of the United States Senate in 1933. His statement follows.

Circular No. 1 of the War Finance Corporation
Information for prospective applicants for advances under Section 21 of the War Finance Corporation Act

Commercial Banking Practice Under the Federal Reserve Act
This work, published in 1918, contains the law and regulations, the informal rulings of the Federal Reserve Board, and the opinions of counsel governing bank acceptances, rediscounts, advances, and open market transactions of the early Federal Reserve Banks.
Digitization of the document was sponsored by Microsoft as part of the Microsoft Book Search Service.

Compilation of Basic Banking Laws
This compilation was first created in 1992 for the House Committee on Banking and Financial Services to bring together in one publication the major statues affecting insured depository institutions and their customers. It has been revised periodically.

Concordance of Statistics Available in Selected Federal Reserve Publications
The Concordance of Statistics acts as a general guide to the statistics published by the Federal Reserve Board. It lists the number and title for all of the tables found in the Federal Reserve Bulletin, Annual Statistical Digest, and Statistical Digest. Each of the listings also details the frequency of the data updates.

Consumer Price Index
The Consumer Price Index was a monthly report on consumer price movements, including tables and technical notes. It was issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Office of Prices and Living Conditions between 1953 and 1974. (Continued by CPI Detailed Report).

Consumer Price Index: History and Techniques
This bulletin was prepared by members of the staff of the Office of Prices and Living Conditions as a historical summary covering the scope and method of compiling the Consumer Price Index, and a description of the 1964 revision of the index. Much of the material included in this bulletin was previously issued as separate articles or releases.

CPI Detailed Report
The CPI Detailed Report (continues Consumer Price Index) is a monthly publication issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics beginning in 1974. The publication reports on consumer price movements, including statistical tables and technical notes. Statistics covers in detail two indexes: consumer price index for all uban consumers (CPI-U) and the consumer price index for wage earners and clerical workers (CPI-W).

CPI Issues
Report 593 of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Prepared by Janet Lippe Norwood, Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This report was presented at the winter meeting of the National Association of government Labor Officials in Washington, D.C., on January 21, 1980.

Currency Problem and the Present Financial Situation
A series of addresses studying the Crisis of 1907, delivered at Columbia University over the years 1907-1908.
Digitized by Microsoft Corporation.
Includes:

The crisis of 1907 in the light of history / Edwin R.A. Seligman
The modern bank / Frank A. Vanderlip
The stock exchange and the money market / Thomas F. Woodlock
Government currency vs. bank currency / A. Barton Hepburn
Gold movements and foreign exchanges / Albert Strauss
The New York clearing house / William A. Nash
Clearing houses and the currency / James G. Cannon
American and European banking methods and bank legislation compared / Paul M. Warburg
The modern corporation / George W. Perkins

Development of Federal Reserve Policy
This contemporary account of the development and function of the Federal Reserve System in its early days, was written in 1922 by a Professor of Banking and Finance at Washington University, St. Louis.

From the Internet Archive.

Economic Implications of the “Too Big To Fail” Policy
This hearing, held before the Subcommittee on Economic Stabilization of the House of Representatives, reviews the economic implications of a ‘too-big-to-fail policy’ in light of the bank failures that took place in the 1980s. The hearing was intended to address questions about the standard of treatment of uninsured depositors in bank failures.

Economic Indicators
This publication is prepared by the Council of Economic Advisers to supply monthly updates related to the economic conditions in the United States. Economic Indicators provides statistical data both in tabular and graphic form and includes information on consumer and producer prices, employment, production, and money and banking. Tables typically display 10 years of annual data with the most recent 12 to 15 months broken out in detail.

Economic Report of the President
The Economic Report of the President is an annual report written by the Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers. It overviews the nation’s economic progress using text and extensive data appendices. The Economic Report of the President is transmitted to Congress no later than ten days after the submission of the Budget of the United States Government. Information provided includes current and foreseeable trends and numerical goals concerning topics such as employment, production, real income and Federal budget outlays, employment objectives for significant groups of the labor force, annual numeric goals, and a program for carrying out program objectives. The report has been published since 1947.

Economy at Mid-1972
A testimony of the Council of Economic Advisers before the Joint Economic Committee on economic developments since President Nixon’s New Economic Policy was adopted on August 15, 1971.

Employment and Earnings
Employment and Earnings is a monthly publication that details the employment situation in the United States with information on the total labor force, employment, unemployment, hours, and compensation at national and area (state, MSA) levels. Published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor since 1954. (Continues Employment and Payrolls)
Pages not containing data, such as blank pages and pages containing only advertisements, have been deleted from these files.

Employment and Earnings Supplement, Revised Establishment Data
Annual supplement to Employment and Earnings publications, presenting revised data from the establishment survey.

Employment and Payrolls
Employment and Payrolls was a monthly publication detailing the employment situation in the United States with information on the total labor force, employment, unemployment, and compensation at the national and state levels. Published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor from 1935 to 1954. (Merged with Hours and Earnings to form Employment and Earnings)

Employment and Pay Rolls in State Unemployment Compensation Systems
The Bureau of Employment Security began collecting employment and pay roll data in 1938 after fifteen states enacted unemployment compensation laws in 1937. Data in these volumes has been prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. NOTE: There was a slight title change in the 1939 edition (published in 1941). It is call Employment and Wages.

Employment, Hours, and Earnings: United States
This bulletin presents historical monthly and annual average data on national establishment-based employment, hours, and earnings by detailed industry, classified in accordance with the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Manual. The data are obtained from the Current Employment Statistics program.

Energy Independence Authority Act of 1975
Hearings before the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-fourth Congress, second session, on S. 2532, a bill to establish the Energy Independence Authority, a government corporation with authority to provide financing and economic assistance for those sectors of the national economy which are important to the development of domestic sources and the conservation of energy and the attainment of energy independence for the United States in a manner consistent with the protection of the environment; to improve federal government operations so as to assist in the expediting of regulatory procedures which affect energy development; and for other purposes. These hearings took place on April 12, 13, and 14 and May 10, 1976.

Erection of an Office Building by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
These reports were submitted to accompany S. J. Res. 208, giving favorable recommendation for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis to enter into contracts for the erection of buildings for its head office and Little Rock branch.

Expenses of Federal Reserve Banks
Letter from the Governor of the Federal Reserve Board transmitting in response to a Senate resolution of October 14, 1921, certain information relative to the number and salaries of employees of the Federal Reserve Banks; expenditures in the erection of buildings; expenses of general administration, and the amount of net earnings paid to the government as franchise tax.

Federal Banking Laws and Reports
This is a compilation of major Federal banking documents from the period 1780 to 1912. It includes founding documents for the Bank of North America (1781), ordinances for the First and Second Bank of the United States (1791, 1816) as well as reports and proceedings. It was published for the 50th anniversary of the Senate Committee on Banking and Currency in 1963.

Federal Home Loan Bank Board, Home Owners’ Loan Corporation, and Federal Savings and Loan Corporation Annual Reports
The Federal Home Loan Banks were established by the Federal Home Loan Bank Act of 1932. The Board administered a number of other entities including the Federal Savings and Loan Corporation created as part of the National Housing Act of 1934 and abolished in 1989; the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation created by the Home Owners’ Refinancing Act in 1933 and liquidated in 1951, and the Federal Savings and Loan System or Division established by the Board. Annual reports from 1933-1952 are currently posted.

Federal Home Loan Bank Review
Congress passed the Federal Home Loan Bank Act in 1932 during the Great Depression, which established the Federal Home Loan Bank System.

This publication was provided to member institutions from 1934-1947. Annual statistical supplements were published beginning in 1941.

Federal Home Loan Bank Review. Statistical Supplement
This supplement to the Federal Home Loan Bank Review was published annually, beginning in 1941. It brings together reference material bearing upon residential construction and home-financing activities covering approximately a 10-year period.

Federal Relief for Home Owners
Leaflet written for the information of the public regarding the creation of the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation.

Federal Reserve Act
The Federal Reserve Act: Its Origin and Principles was written as a reminiscence by Owen, who drafted the Act. Owen served in the US Senate from 1907 to 1925 and was Chairman of the Senate Committee on Banking and Currency from 1913-1916. His papers are housed at The Carl Albert Center, University of Oklahoma and Library of Congress.

Federal Reserve Bulletin
The monthly Federal Reserve Bulletin was introduced in 1915 by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to present policy issues and provide a journal of record of the activities of the Board. The Bulletin was also constructed to present data in the areas of business, finance, and international transactions that affect U.S. monetary policy and the goals of the Federal Reserve System. Authors from the Federal Reserve Boards’ Research and Statistics, Monetary Affairs, International Finance, Banking Supervision and Regulation, Consumer and Community Affairs, Reserve Bank Operations, and Legal divisions contribute to the contents published in each issue. The Bulletin includes topical research articles, legal developments, Report on the Condition of the U.S. Banking Industry, and other general information.

In 2006, the regular publication of paper issues was discontinued and replaced with an annual compilation available online. Between 2004 and 2008, the Financial and Business Statistics section of the Bulletin was published monthly as the Statistical Supplement to the Federal Reserve Bulletin. This data is now only available as Data Sources at this website http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/supplement/statsupdata/statsupdata.htm

Federal Reserve Open Market Investment Committee (Open Market Policy Conference)
A re-examination of the record of discussions and policy decisions relating to the operations of the Federal Open Market Investment Committee during the years 1923-1930, and of the Open Market Policy Conference during 1930 and the first half of 1931. Two reports, spanning 1923-1928 and 1929-1931, were created for the reference of Federal Open Market Committee members, describing actions taken and the reasons for those actions.

Federal Reserve System: A Blackstone Legal Training Lecture
One of a series of lectures especially prepared for the Blackstone Institute. This 1920 document was digitized for Microsoft Corporation by the Internet Archive in 2007.

Federal Reserve System: Its Origin and Growth
These volumes contain recollections and reflections of Paul M. Warburg, an advocate for central banking and an appointee to the first Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He served as a governor until 1918, and later as a member of the Federal Advisory Council from 1921-1926.

Federal Reserve System — Its Purpose and Work
Various authors contributed articles to this issue of the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, edited by A.D. Welton and C. H. Crennan. Published in 1922, this work documents the early organization and function of the Federal Reserve System.

Final Report on the Reconstruction Finance Corporation
This final report on the Reconstruction Finance Corporation provides an outline of the various programs which the RFC undertook and a summary of the projects undertaken by those authorities. From the foreword, “… there has been incorporated in the report a considerable volume of statistical material on RFC lending and investment functions…”

Financial Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 100,000
Financial Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 100,000 was published for the years 1932-1941.
Continuation of Financial Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000.
Continued by City Finances.

Financial Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000
Financial Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000 was published for the years 1909-1931. No statistics were published for 1913-1914 and 1920.
Continuation of Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000.
Continued by Financial Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 100,000.

Foreign Investment and Arab Boycott Legislation
Hearings before the Subcommittee on International Finance of the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-fourth Congress, first session on S. 425, Amendment no. 24 thereto, S. 953, S. 995, and S. 1303. The purpose of these hearings was to address challenges from OPEC monetary surpluses and evidence of Arab boycott pressures to U. S. interests and principles. These hearings took place on July 22 and 23, 1975.

Formative Period of the Federal Reserve System (During the World Crisis)
A personal narrative by W. P. G. Harding, former Governor of the Federal Reserve Board, and a key figure in the early years of the Federal Reserve System. He outlines the functions of the Federal Reserve Banks and the laws and principles under which they have been conducted.

Gasoline Shortages
Hearings before the Subcommittee on Economic Stabilization of the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, first session, on oversight of the economic stabilization aspects of the present gasoline shortage. These hearings took place on May 22 and June 6, 1979.

Gold Reserve Act of 1934
This series of hearings were held January 15-19, 1934 before the House Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures. Expert testimony was provided by Dr. O.M.W. Sprague, Frank A. Vanderlip, and Paul Warburg among others.

Handbook of Cyclical Indicators
Supplement to the Business Conditions Digest. The first, 1977, edition was created in response to a major revision to the Business Conditions Digest occurring in 1976. The handbooks cover over 300 time series, with particular attention to cyclical indicators and composite indexes. Each handbook contains descriptive information about the series, historical data for the series, and explanation of the composite indexes of cyclical indicators.

History of the Legal Tender Paper Money Issued During the Great Rebellion, Being a Loan Without Interest and a National Currency
E. G. SPAULDING, Chairman of the Subcommittee of the Ways and Means at the time of the 1862 Legal Tender Act, compiled this history of paper legal tender. At the time of the Act, the United States had no national currency and no means to support the Union effort in the Civil War. The Act was passed to authorize the creation of paper money not backed by gold or silver, legal tender for “payment of all taxes, internal duties, excises, debts, and demands of every kind due to the United States.”

The Act laid the foundation for the creation of a permanent currency in the decades after the Civil War.

This publication originally digitized by the Microsoft Corporation.

Individual Statements of Condition of National Banks
Prior to 1923, this table was published in the annual report of the Comptroller. Between 1923 and 1929, the tables were issued as a numbered supplement. From 1930-1941, the supplements were lettered alphabetically from “H” to “S”. No supplements were issued for the years 1942-1948, inclusive. Data is presented as of close of business, December 31 of the indicated year. All were published by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency as part of the Annual Report issued the following year.

Intermediate Targets and Indicators for Monetary Policy: A Critical Survey
Studies undertaken by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reviewing a broad array of financial variables proposed for use in formulating and implementing monetary policy.

International Petrodollar Crisis
Hearings before the Subcommittee on International Finance of the Committee on Banking and Currency, House of Representatives, Ninety-third Congress, second session, which intended to cover the following topics: 1) what oil producing countries would do with their new found wealth and the impact on international and domestic policies, 2) the potential damage to the International Monetary System and to the world economy as a result of a petrodollar glut, and 3) the viability of the proposals for recycling petrodollars. These hearings took place on July 9 and August 13, 1974.

Investigation of Economic Problems
Hearings before the Senate Committee on Finance, pursuant to S. Res. 315 “authorizing and directing the Finance Committee to make an investigation and study of the present economic problems of the United States with a view to securing constructive suggestions with respect to the solution of such problems.” Chaired by Reed Smoot; hearings held from February 13 to 28, 1933.

Lending Functions of the Federal Reserve Banks: A History
This publication is a history of the lending activities of the Federal Reserve System. It covers all enactments of Congress between 1913 and 1973 and all regulations and public rulings issued by the Board of Governors for that period, including those that were later repealed, revoked or superseded.

Lombard Street: A Description of the Money Market
This work, originally published in 1873,was one of the first to practically address the management of financial crises and the role of an expanded “central bank” in England. The author, Walter Bagehot, worked in the shipping and banking industries, co-founded the “National Review”, and became editor-in-chief of “The Economist”. The posted version was digitized as part of the Google Books Library Project.

Low-Interest Loans for Residential Solar Heating and Cooling Equipment
Hearing before the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development of the Committee on Banking, Currency and Housing, House of Representatives, Ninety-fourth Congress, first session on H.R. 3849 (a bill to establish in the Department of Housing and Urban Development a direct low-interest loan program to assist home owners and builders in purchasing and installing solar heating (or combined solar heating and cooling) equipment) and H.R. 8524 (a bill to amend the Small Business Act to establish within the Small Business Administration a new direct low-interest loan program to assist homeowners and builders in purchasing and installing solar heating (or combined solar heating and cooling) equipment). This hearing took place on November 5, 1975.

Missourians on the Move: A Study of Intra-State Transient Men and Boys Applying at St. Louis April, 1934-August, 1935
Published by the St. Louis Bureau for Men, formerly the Bureau for Homeless Men, this 1938 publication analyzes the transient and homeless population of men and boys in Missouri at the end of the Great Depression.

Modern History of FOMC Communication: 1975-2002
A chronicle of the evolution of the Federal Open Market Committee’s policy for communicating with the public during the last quarter of the 20th century. Authorized for public release on 8/19/2009.

Money Trust Investigation: Investigation of Financial and Monetary Conditions in the United States Under House Resolutions Nos. 429 and 504
In 1912, a special subcommittee was convened by the Chairman of the House Banking and Currency Committee, Arsene P. Pujo. Its purpose was to investigate the “money trust,” a small group of Wall Street bankers that exerted powerful control over the nation’s finances. The committee’s majority report concluded that a group of financial leaders had abused the public trust to consolidate control over many industries. The Pujo Committee report created a climate of public opinion that lead to the passage of the Federal Reserve Act of 1913 and the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914.

The hearings were conducted between May 16, 1912 and February 26, 1913. The transcript of the hearings was published in three volumes. It is presented in the original 29 parts with the index, a table of interlocking directorates of 18 financial institutions, and the majority/minority report of the committee.

National Bank Real Estate Loans
Hearings before the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions of the Committee on Banking and Currency of the United States Senate, 88th Congress, 2nd Session, on S. 2576: A bill to amend section 24 of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 371) relating to certain limitations on real estate loans by national banks. These hearings took place on March 4 and 10, 1964.

National Energy Conservation Policy Act
Hearings before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-fifth Congress, first session, on title I, part A of S. 1469, a bill to establish a comprehensive energy policy. These hearings took place on June 27, 28, and 29, 1977.

National Income and Product Accounts Benchmark Revisions
The first compilation of national statistics was prepared for the U.S. Senate in 1934. It presented data for 1929-1932. Subsequently, periodic reports were prepared that provided comprehensive revisions of the estimates of national income and their component series against the previous benchmarks. Descriptions of the 2003 and 2009 revisions are available on the Bureau of Economic Analysis website. The associated tables are available under the National Data links.

Non-Family Boys on Relief: A Study of Non-Family Boys, Age 16-21, on Relief in St. Louis prior to August 31, 1933
Published in 1937 by the Bureau for Homeless Men, this study analyzes why young men were homeless or living independently.

Official Opinion of Thomas W. Gregory, Attorney General, Issued on November 22, 1915, Regarding the Ability of the Federal Reserve to Eliminate Bank Districts
This opinion of Thomas W. Gregory, issued on November 22, 1915, regarding the ability of the Federal Reserve to eliminate Bank districts,
from Official opinions of the Attorneys General of the United States : advising the President and heads of departments in relation to their official duties. Vol. 30

Oil Imports and Energy Security
Hearings before the Ad Hoc Committee on the Domestic and International Monetary Effect of Energy and Other Natural Resource Pricing of the Committee on Banking and Currency, House of Representatives, Ninety-third Congress, second session. Convened for the purpose of having a staff presentation of part II of the committee’s study on the pricing of energy and other natural resources. Much of the study relates to Project Independence projections on expected American production, cost, and what the various options of the OPEC countries might be. These hearings took place on August 9 and 12, 1974.

Outline of Federal Reserve Branch Banks Covering Powers, Functions, and Character and Volume of Business Handled
Outline of powers and functions of Federal Reserve branch banks, prepared by the Division of Reports and Statistics, and the Division of Bank Operations, of the Federal Reserve Board.

Petroleum Product Shortages
Hearings before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the United States Senate, Ninety-third Congress, first session, on the impact of petroleum product shortages on the national economy, in relation to the committee’s consideration of the Economic Stabilization Act. These hearings took place on May 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, 1973.

PPI Detailed Report Annual Supplement
This annual supplement continues the Producer Price Indexes Annual report in 1996. It presents monthly indexes and annual averages for each year. Major price developments during the year are also summarized.

Proceedings of the Academy of Political Science in the City of New York
Volume IV, 1913-1914. Proceedings on banking and currency and banking reform in the United States. Originally digitized as part of the Google Books project.

Producer Prices and Price Indexes
Producer Prices and Price Indexes (continues Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes) is a monthly news release issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor from March 1978 to June 1996. Included are average changes over time in the selling prices received by domestic producers for their output. Prices included are from the first commercial transaction for many products and some services. It is continued as the PPI Detailed Report.

Rand McNally Bankers Directory
Bankers’ Directories contain banking information on banks in the towns and counties of the United States at the turn of the century. The names of bank directors, officers, and their capital and deposits are included, as well as lists of lawyers and current banking laws. They include colored maps of the states and some major cities.

Realities of Unemployment
Pamphlet created by Harry L. Hopkins, Administrator of the Works Progress Administration.

Recovery: How Fast and How Far?
This report, produced by the Congressional Budget Office, was written in 1975 when key economic indicators were signaling that the U.S. was recovering from its longest and worst recession since the 1930s. The report discusses forecasts for increasing production, but continued high unemployment, and likely renewed inflation due to rising prices. The CBO presents alternative public policy actions, including recommendations for the Federal Reserve System, that were estimated to have significant effects on the rate of recovery during the following couple of years.

Relationship of Prices to Economic Stability and Growth
This compendium of papers, submitted by the 47 panelists appearing before the Joint Economic Committee, was published to familiarize members with the issues prior to the hearings.

Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the War Finance Corporation (in Liquidation)
Report regarding the War Finance Corporation in liquidation for the year ended November 30, 1929

Report on Audit of Federal Home Loan Bank Board and the Federal Home Loan Banks
Audits of the financial statements and records of the Federal Home Loan Bank Administration and the Federal Home Loan Banks, in compliance with the Government Corporation Control Act. Reports for the years following the report for the fiscal year ending June 1952 were published separately for the Federal Home Loan Board and Federal Home Loan Banks.

Retail Prices
This series of bulletins from the Bureau of Labor Statistics is represented by the summary issues Nos. 495 (1890-1928) issued August 1929 and 635 (1923-1936) issued October 1937. The tables provide detailed information for various foods and food groups by year and by city. The 1929 issue also includes coal and gas.

Risk, Uncertainty, and Profit
A classic 1921 text on general economic theory.

Role of Public Transportation in the Nation’s Energy Problems
Hearing before the Subcommittee on Housing and Urban Affairs of the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, first session, on plans for increasing federal assistance for public transit as a part of the President’s energy program. This hearing took place on July 18, 1979.

Select List of References on the Monetary Question, 1913
1913 bibliography compiled by Library of Congress, Division of Bibliography.

Subjects covered include:
Banking and currency
Banking and currency in foreign countries
Banking and currency in the United States
Crises
Guaranty of bank deposits
Credit and credit instruments
Clearing houses
Foreign exchange
Author index
Subject index

Shadow Open Market Committee Policy Statement and Position Papers
The Shadow Open Market Committee (SOMC), an independent organization with members from academic institutions and private organizations, was founded by Professors Karl Brunner of the University of Rochester and Allan Meltzer of Carnegie-Mellon.  Its first semi-annual meeting was held on September 14, 1973.  The original objective was to evaluate the policy choices and actions of the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee (FOMC).  Since 1973, the SOMC has met semi-annually to discuss economic policy.

The reports of the committee from 1998-2006 are available on the Shadow Open Market Committee website.

Stabilization Hearings
Hearings before the Committee on Banking and Currency, House of Representatives, Sixty ninth Congress, First Session, on H.R. 7895, a bill to amend Section 14 of the Federal Reserve Act to provide for the stabilization of the price level for commodities in general. Included are Parts 1 and 2, as well as an Index.

State Bank Call Reports – Texas
The files posted here contain the reports submitted by Texas state banks and state banks and trust companies for the years 1929 and 1933. They testify to the number of banks closed in Texas during the Great Depression. Microfilm of these bank call reports was produced by the Texas State Library, State Records Center, from a collection from the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. To date, only a limited set has been available for digitizing. The quality of the digital images is the best available from the microfilm format. Many forms are hand-written and are not searchable.

To cite this work, please use: Quarterly condition of state banks, 1929, 1933, Texas Department of Banking. Archives and Information Services Division. Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Web. [insert date]. ‹http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/publications/bkcall/›.

Statistical Abstract of the United States
The Statistical Abstract of the United States was first published in 1878 under the authority of the U.S. Treasury Department. It is a comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States. Sources of data include the Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic Analysis, and many other Federal agencies and private organizations. The Statistical Abstract has been published annually by the U.S. Census Bureau since 1938.

Statistical Analysis of Non-Family Men on Relief in St. Louis 1925-1936
This 1937 publication by the St. Louis Bureau for Men summarizes 12 years of of statistical information on men and boys who filed for relief and indicated that they had no family during the Great Depression.

Statistical Atlas of the United States: 1914
This statistical atlas includes 503 illustrations divided into 10 general topics, which use maps, charts, and graphs to interpret the statistical data of the 13th Census of the United States conducted in 1910. It includes a table of contents, a section of explanatory text for each topic, and an index to the illustrations. It was prepared under the supervision of Charles S. Sloane, Geographer of the Census, with the assistance of Evelyn L. Yeomans and Katharine T. West.

Statistical Atlas of the United States Based on the Results of the Ninth Census 1870
In honor of our data mapping site, GEOFRED (http://geofred.stlouisfed.org), we have posted a very old data mapping product. Featuring thematic maps, the Statistical Atlas was a landmark publication of the federal government. It displays census information about the United States using choropleth mapping (thematic mapping), a technique common with modern GIS systems. The maps highlight the condition of the country immediately following the Civil War. For more information about this important document, see Donald Dahmann’s commentary at the Library of Congress’ American Memory website. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gmdhtml/census2.html#frst

Statistical Supplement to the Federal Reserve Bulletin
The Statistical Supplement to the Federal Reserve Bulletin is a continuation of the Financial and Business Statistics section that appeared in each month’s issue of the Federal Reserve Bulletin. The Supplement was published monthly, January 2004 through December 2008. The majority of data published in the Statistical Supplement are continued on the Federal Reserve Board’s website at http://www.federalreserve.gov.

Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 25,000
Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 25,000 was published for the years 1902/1903. A supplement exists for 1903: Statistics of Cities Having a Population of 8,000 to 25,000. These documents were published as bulletins by the Bureau of the Census.
Continued by Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000.

The documents below were digitized by Internet Archive, sponsored by the Microsoft Corporation.

Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000
Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000 was published for the years 1904-1908.
Continuation of the statistics published in the Bulletin of the Bureau of Labor, 1899-1903.
Split into Financial Statistics of Cities Having a Population of over 30,000 and General Statistics of Cities.

The documents for the years 1904-1907 were digitized by Internet Archive, sponsored by the Microsoft Corporation.

Statistics of Income
An annual statistical report of economic data compiled from the income returns for individuals and business entities, produced since 1916 by the Internal Revenue Service of the U.S. Department of Treasury. In 1934, the report split into two parts: Part 1 presents data from individuals; Part 2 presents data from businesses. Beginning in the 1950s, these reports were replaced with annual and special reports, usually focused on single taxpayer groups.

Statistics on Banking, 1934-1996
A statistical history of the United States Banking Industry published by the Division of Research and Statistics of the FDIC

Stemming Inflation: the Office of Emergency Preparedness and the 90-day freeze
A comprehensive history of the management of the 90-day wage-price freeze, undertaken by the Office of Emergency Preparedness and the newly established Cost of Living Council.

Stock Exchange Practices. Hearings before the Committee on Banking and Currency Pursuant to S.Res. 84 and S.Res. 56 and S.Res. 97.
This series of hearings, also known as the Pecora Commission hearings, was conducted by a subcommittee of the United States Senate Banking and Currency Committee between 1932 and 1934. The hearings investigated stock exchange practices and their effect on American commerce, the national banking system, and the government securities market. They also addressed issues of tax evasion and avoidance. The record of the hearings includes more than 12,000 printed pages with more than 1,000 exhibits received in evidence. Originally authorized by Senate Resolution 84 on March 2, 1932, the scope of the investigation was broadened with by Senate Resolution 56 on April 4, 1933 and Senate Resolution 97 on June 8, 1933. Prior to the appointment of Ferdinand Pecora on January 24, 1933, Claude Branch, William A. Gray and John Marrinan served as legal counsel for the early hearings. The transcripts were published in two series. The initial six parts covered the the work authorized by Resolution 84. The second 20 parts and final report document the expanded scope of the investigation after the passage of Resolutions 56 and 97.

The work of this committee set the stage for the Banking Act of 1933, the Securities Act of 1933, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Street Begging in St. Louis, Including a Report of a Fact-Finding Survey of Street Begging Made During November and December, 1936
1937 publication by the St. Louis Bureau for Homeless Men.

Studies on Causes and Consequences of the 1989-92 Credit Slowdown
This publication examines a broad range of issues concerning credit market issues between 1989 and 1992.

Summary of the Report on Condition of Woman and Child Wage Earners in the United States – Women in Industry Series, No. 5
Bulletin of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics No. 175.

Supplement to Banking & Monetary Statistics
The Supplements to Banking and Monetary Statistics were published to add to the data not contained in the original volumes (1914-1941 and 1941-1970). The Governors of the Federal Reserve System designed the publication to be a convenient reference source for the statistics that had appeared in the Board’s annual reports and in the monthly Federal Reserve Bulletin. Only the sections available below were published.

Supplement to Economic Indicators
This publication was prepared for the use of the Joint Economic Committee, and contains background material regarding the data that go into the Economic Indicators. Each series in the Economic Indicators is presented with a description, written in nontechnical language, a table summarizing that series from 1929 to the time of publication, and references to additional technical publications.
Eight editions of the Supplement have been prepared, approximately biennially. The 1953-1957 editions were published under the title Historical and Descriptive Supplement to Economic Indicators. No editions were prepared between 1967 and 1980.

Survey of Current Business
A U.S. Department of Commerce monthly publication that provides data on U.S. business on the regional, national, and international levels. Among statistical series covered are personal income, inventories and sales, national income and product accounts, foreign direct investment in the United States, U.S. direct investment abroad, international transactions, and gross state product.

Survey of Current Business. Business Statistics (Biennial Supplement)
Business Statistics is a basic reference publication designed to provide historical perspective to the statistical data published originally in the Survey of Current Business, the monthly magazine of the Department of Commerce. A wide range of economic data is presented including price and production indices for all sectors of the United States business sector. Major sections of the publication include indexes, prices, employment, finance, trade, and production by sector.

Publication history:
Survey of Current Business. Annual Supplement: 1931-1932 (annual)
Survey of Current Business. Supplement: 1936-1942 (biennial)
Statistical Supplement to the Survey of Current Business: 1947-1949 (biennial)
Survey of Current Business. Business Statistics: 1951-1991 (biennial)

Synthetic Fuel Production
Hearing before the Subcommittee on Economic Stabilization of the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-sixth Congress, first session, to study various proposals designed to reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign sources of energy through the development of synthetic fuels. This hearing took place on June 20, 1979.

Texas Banking Crisis, Causes and Consequences
Analysis by John O’Keefe, Financial Economist for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, to explain the high failure rates of Texas banks in the 1980s. (July 1990)

To Extend the Authority of the Federal Reserve Banks to Purchase U.S. Obligations Directly from the Treasury
Hearing before the Committee on Banking and Currency of the House of Representatives, Ninety-Second Congress, First Session, on H.R. 7632 and S. 1700, regarding a proposed amendment to section 14(b) of the Federal Reserve Act, providing a two year extension of the authority of the Federal Reserve banks to purchase U.S. obligations directly from the Treasury. This direct purchase authority was initially enacted during World War II, and continued on a temporary basis since that time, allowing the Treasury to borrow directly from the Federal Reserve banks on a short-term basis as needed.

Unemployment in the United States
Hearings before the Committee on Education and Labor. 70th Congress, Second Session. Pursuant to S. Res. 219, a resolution providing for an analysis and appraisal of reports on unemployment and systems for prevention and relief thereof together with Senate Report No. 2072. December 11-14, 17-19, 1928 and January 9, 14 and February 7-9, 1929.

Unemployment Relief Census
Reports of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration presenting data regarding size and composition of relief families, organized by geographic divisions, states, and cities.

United States Budget in Brief
The United States Budget in Brief presents a more concise, less technical overview of the Budget of the United States Government. It is intended for the use of the general public.

U.S. Income and Output
This anniversary volume supplements the material contained in the National Income and Product Accounts revision for 1929-1953. It includes a table that provides cross-references for the tables in these companion publications.

U.S. Monetary Policy and Financial Markets
Ann-Marie Meulendyke, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, writes on the monetary policy process and financial markets of the 1980s.

Wholesale Prices
A summary of commodity wholesale prices for the period 1913-1928. This publication provides detailed charts and tables comparing commodity prices by groups and years. It includes comparisons to foreign countries.

http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/publications/

ASSETS OF LEWIS CASS PA YSEUR
As Recorded in book 665, Page 20
The following is a list of only one third of the companies which are listed in public records as the assets of
Lewis Cass Payseur which have been assigned to the Lewis Cass Payseur Trust Company Inc.
All of the Companies listed here were each issued, upon formation, fifty thousand (50,000) preferred, or
special "Class "A" Shares, those being the only such shares authorized and issued, which shares represented
the true ownership of the corporation.
L. C. Payseur owned nine tenths of all of the preferred share issued of each of these companies forty five
thousand (45,000) and the rest of the world owns only five thousand (5,000) shares of the issued stock.
Common shares, or "non-voting shares" are the ones, where applicable, which are traded on the stock
exchange, and they do not reflect the ownership as is commonly thought.
Note: Companies listed in the Fortune 500 Magazine of May 5, 1980 are noted by the name of the
Company followed by "(#—)",
This is not a complete list of the Payseur Assets as this is only one third of his holdings, the estate was filed
in three different locations with different assets listed at each state and county site that it was filed in. In
another attempt to cover up the ownership trail, but you can get an idea of the magnitude of his holding
with this 1/3 list.
Railway. Railroad and Related Companies
Lancaster & Chester Railway Company
Cheraw & Chester Railroad Company
Leased for 99 years to the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company, executed October 3, 1882.
and recorded in the Court of Probate and the County Recorders office of Chester County. South Carolina.
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, South Carolina Division:
Along with the liens of the "iron rails and cross-ties" of lines under 99 year leases which have been merged
into the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company: some known as:
Catawba Valley Railway Company: Chester County, South Carolina
The Chattanooga. Augusta and Charleston Air Line Railway Co., recorded in Chester County, South Carolina.
The Memphis / Charleston Railroad Company: The Seaboard Air Lines System of Railroads Company, as
recorded in the office of the Probate Judge in and for the County of Dorchester, South Carolina, in Book "S
23" at Page 7, Dated December 9. 1899.
The Port Royal Railroad Company, as recorded with the office of the Probate Judge of Barnwell County,
South Carolina.
The Chester and Lenoir Narrow Gauge Railroad Company, as recorded in the County of Chester, South
Carolina, formerly known as the Wilmington. Charlotte and Rutherfordton Railway Company, as formed in
the City of Lincolnton, North Carolina, by the Payseur family.
Buffalo, Union and Carlisle Railway:- Union. South Carolina
C. and W.C. Railway: Anderson. South Carolina
Atlantic Coast Line Railway Company:- Richland. South Carolina
G. & F. Railway Company: Greenwood, South Carolina
C. N. & L. Railway Company: Newberry, South Carolina
283
H. and B. Railway Company:- Colleton, South Carolina
C. and L. Railway Company:- Chesterfield, South Carolina
C. M. and C. Railway Company:- Chesterfield, South Carolina
Northwestern South Carolina Railway Company:- Spartanburg, South Carolina
Atlanta and Charlotte Railway Company:- Spartanburg, South Carolina
Ashville and Spartanburg Railway Company:- Spartanburg, South Carolina
Spartanburg, Union and Columbia Railway Company:- Spartanburg. S. C.
Columbia and Greenville Railway Company:- Greenville. South Carolina
Southern Railway Company, South Carolina Division:- Columbia, South Carolina
South Side Railroad Co.:- Connecting Atlanta. Georgia with Washington, D. C.
Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad Company and Alabama Mineral Land Company of New York parent
to the famed Standard Oil now Exxon Oil.
Ashley Branch and Coal Line Railway Company
Georgia. Carolina and Northern Railroad: and its 99 year lease to Seaboard Air Line Railway Company
King's Mountain Gold Mine and Railroad Company: Companies listed in Real Property Book 1734 Page 62 et.
seq.. Court of Probate, in Alabama
Louisville and Nashville Railroad
Nashville and Decatur Railroad
The Great Southern Railroad Line
South and North Alabama Railroad
Mobile and Montgomery Railroad
Georgia Pacific and T. A., Louisville Ky.
Pennsylvania Railroad: See Chart on Penn Central Company, 6.5 Billion Dollar Empire
Mexican Railway:- Mexico City, Mexico
Mexican Central Railway:- Guadalajara, Mexico
New York Central Railroad
Southern Pacific Railroad
Missouri Pacific Railroad
Mobile and Ohio Railroad
Charleston, Cincinnati and Chicago Railroad Company (the Federal Reserve)
Narrow Gauge, Camden, Lancaster, Charlotte, all in North Carolina
Georgia Pacific Railroad Company (#56)
Pullman Company (builders of Pullman cars for the Railways)
Banks and Related Companies
Bank of Lancaster:- Lancaster County. South Carolina
First Bank and Trust Company:-Of Lancaster, South Carolina
The Lancaster Building and Loan Association
The Bank of Heath Springs
The Bank of Charleston
The Bank of Kershaw
Kershaw Mercantile and Banking Company
National Loan and Exchange Bank of Columbia
First National Bank of Camden
National Exchange Bank of Chester
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York
New York Trust Company
The Bank of Richmond
National Loan and Exchange Bank of Camden
284
Raleigh Savings Bank
American Trust and Savings Bank - Birmingham, Al.
Birmingham Trust and Savings Bank - Birmingham, A l .
Chase National Bank
Riggs National Bank
Hanover National Bank - New York
Brandvwine Bank - Maryland
Hamilton National Bank
South Carolina National Bank
Jefferson Savings and Loan Association
Bank of South Carolina
Bank of New York
Bank of Macon, Georgia
Pennsvlvania National Bank
Sandoz Bank
Painsville. Ohio Bank
Cotton Mills
Lancaster Cotton Mills:-Now known as Springs Mills Inc. of Lancaster, S. C ................. (#319)
The Eureka Cotton Mills
The Springstein Cotton Mills
Dan River Cotton Mills:-Danville, VA
Lorav Cotton Mills
Belton Cotton Mills
The Lancaster Cotton Oil Company
The N. K. Fairbank Company (Cotton Oil). Chicago. III.
Thread and Sewing Machine Companies
Singer Manufacturing Company:-New York
The New Home Sewing Machine Company:-30 Union Sq., New York Household Sewing Machine Company:-
Providence, Rhode Island
Hartford Sewing Machine Company:-Connecticut
Renington Sewing Machine Company
Domestic Sewing Machine Company
Clark's O.N.T. Cotton Thread Company
Corticelli Silk Thread Company
Pharr and Long Clothiers 42 S. Tryon St., Charlotte, N.C.
J.P. Coats Thread Company
Willimantic Thread Company and/or
Willimantic Linen Company
Chicago-Kenosha Hosiery Company:-Kenosha, Wisconsin
E.C.Stahn and Company:-Chester, S. C. (Watches, Jewelry and sewing machines)
Electric and Power Companies
Southern Power Company
Duke Power Company
Lancaster Light and Power Company
Potomac Electric Company
General Electric
Company .......................................................................................................................................(#9)
Gold and Silver Companies
285
Reed Gold Mine
Gastonia Gold Mine
Gold Hill Mining Company
King's Mountain Gold Mine (and Railway Company as above)
Clyta Oro Mining Company-Supplied all the gold for the Federal Reserve
Union Silver Company
Lotowana Silver Mining Company
Iron and Steel (and other metals) Companies
Lincoln Iron Company (formerly Lincolnton Tin Mine and Smelter) now Carnegie Steel)
Woodward Iron Company
Ingall's Steel Company
The Ingalls Iron Works Company of Birmingham. Alabama
Carnegie Steel Company
Aluminum Company of American (ALCOA) ..................................................................................................(#63)
Motor Vehicle Companies
American Motors Company...............................................................................................................................(#109)
General Motors Corporation ............................................................................................................................... (# 2)
Cadillac Motor Car Company
Carolina Cadillac Company Studebaker Carriages and Wagons Company
Insurance Companies
Home Insurance Company 119 Broadway. New York (From Orrville and Selma, Alabama, allegedly the
parent to all insurance companies )
Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York
Old American Insurance Company:- Kansas City
William's and Gregory Insurance Company:- Lancaster. S. C.
Tobacco and Related Companies
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company........ (#39)
George W. Helme and Company (Helme's Railroad Mill Snuff) Helmetta, N.J.
American Tobacco Company
Regalia De La Francis Cigar Company
Watch Companies
Elgin National Watch Company
National "Elgin" Watch Company
I l l i n o i s "Springfield" Watch Company
American "Waltham" Watch Company
The Centennial (1776-1876) Watch Company
Waterbury Watch Company
Land and Real Estate Companies
Alabama Mineral Land Company of New York
Woodgin Plantation:-Leased to Frisco Railroad
Bondurant Plantation:-Leased to St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad
T. M. Hughes Real Estate Agency:-Lancaster, S. C.
286
Food and Other Household Goods
Gail Borden, Eagle Brand Milk Company.......................................................................................... (#73 Borden)
The Genessee Pure Food Company ........................................................................................ (#50 General Foods)
Heinzs Pickle Company.................................................................................................................... (#139 Heinz 57)
The American Cereal Company................................................................................................. (#176 Quaker Oals)
United Fruit Trading Company:- Linked to Grace Shipping Lines
Armour and Company:-(Formerly Armour Meat Packing Company)
The Lancaster Hardware Company
Mimaugh's Department Store
Bibb's Stove and Range Company
Swift and Company
The Woolson Spice Company
Cleveland's Baking Powder Company
White Mountain Ice Cream Freezer Company
Arbuckle Brothers Coffee Company
King's Buckwheat Flour Company
Lustro Cleaners Company
Lincolnton Drug Company: Became Rexall Drugs
Fleming Brothers Cologne
New Mown Hay Sachet Colgate and Company. Perfumers of New York
Boll Brothers Manufacturing Company Harrisburg, Pa. (metal beds and bedding)
Tarrant's Aperient Seltzer Company
Celluloid Eye Glasses Company (Patent #03-13-1877) S.O.M. Company
Steele and Price Manufacturing Company (Yeast, flavoring extracts etc., Chicago, III.)
Brown's Iron Bitters Company
Richmond Heater Company (wood burning heaters)
Charles W.S. Banks Furniture Company Baltimore, Md
Peloubet and Company, Bloomfield. NJ - Mfr. Standard Brand Organs
Ehvet Magnesia Mfg Company
Boston Rubber Shoe Company
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
Miscellaneous Companies
Colt Firearms
Company............................................... ............................................(#165)
Standard Oil Company........................................................................................................................#10, #6, and
#32)
Exxon
Corporation ....................................................................................................................................................(#1)
B. F. Goodrich
Company..................................................................................................................................... (#112)
Sherwin-Williams Paint
Company ................................................................................................................. (#251)
The Fort Mill Manufacturing Company
Catawba Fertilizer Company
Lancaster Manufacturing Company
Western Union Telegraph Company
Ashley Phosphate Fertilizer Company
Steamship (British) Manhattan
Lancaster Merchantile Company
Pearl Powder Company
H.S. Robinson and Company
Walter A. Wood Company of New York
Knapp and Company of New York
287
Scott and Bowne Manufacturing Company of New York
Reinthanl and Newman of New York
J. Lichtenstein and Son of New York
Bimbel Brothers Stores New York and Philadelphia
Rochester Photo Press of Rochester, New York
Newmond and Company Buffalo, New York
I. C. Hood and Company
E.W. Hoyte and Company
Dr. J. C. Bayer and Company-Bayer Aspirin Co.
Hill and Greene
Ed V. Price and Company
W. B. Clapp, Young and Company
Hurst, Purnell and Company
National Twist Drill and Tool Co.
Millhiser's Manufacturing Company
Joseph Emmanuel and Company
Silverine Company-Onieda Silver Co.
J. P. Stevens and Brothers (paper mill)
The Hamilton Company of Canada
Cabbet and Company of Spain
In order to keep the true ownership hidden from the government and the public all of these companies and
hundreds more were tucked away in parent corporations and companies, almost all of the railroads across the
united states were merged into the new "Southern Railway", merger of 1906 that J. P. Morgan helped
orchestrate for Payseur.
The Southern Railway, which contained almost all of the railway companies were hidden in one little
insignificant short railway line that was called the "Lancaster and Chester Railway Company". The family
joke is that they own a little railroad company by the name of the L&C Railway Company and it has a spur
line called Southern Railway, which is obstinately all the railroads. They also own one other important little
railroad, "The Cheraw and Chester Railroad Company".
The Lancaster and Chester Railway, was owned by a cotton mill by the name of the "Lancaster Cotton
Mill", which was owned by L.C. Payseur, the name of Lancaster Cotton Mill was changed in the 1930's to
Springs Mills Inc. but the ownership was still by L.C. Payseurs'. It is very important that you remember
this one little paragraph.
L.C. Payseur also owned "The Bank of Lancaster", which in recent years has gone on a name changing
tangent the last known names were the (NCNB) North Carolina National Bank then it merged with its self and
became known as NationsBank For a short digression, research discovered that in the 1980's George Bush
became the chairman of the executive committee of First International Bank of Houston. He also became a
director of Fist International Bank shares. Inc. ("InterFirst"). InterFirst became the largest bank in Texas and
was reportedly running speculation all over South America, China and Europe. Later InterFirst merged with
Republic Bank in 1987 to form First Republic Bank, eventually as it appeared all banks in Texas got into a non
sovereign situation if you can believe that. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, with the connivance of
the IRS, awarded the assets of First Republic Bank to the North Carolina National Bank in exchange for no
payment whatsoever on the part of NCNB. Why should they have to pay themselves? NationsBank, which is
reputedly a darling of the intelligence community, which is not quite right but makes some sense, being as the
banks and CIA are owned by the railroad.
Payseur also owned "Southern Power Company" which is today known as "Southern Company" and owns
the control of all power companies in the united states by law that states that only railroads can manufacture
electricity. That is why everyone that comes up with a better and cheaper form of energy and would become a
threat to the power company is put out of business. Because the railroad has a monopoly at least until the 99
year leases are up.
288
Payseur owned "The Lancaster Manufacturing Company", which controlled the production of all wood
products, such as railroad ties, railroad cars, service poles, furniture, paper etc., etc.. This is were the railroad
land grants come in wi t h such names as Boise Cascade, Weyerhaeuser, Crown Zellierback. Mead, Regency
companies using the railroad land leased to them "only" from Payseur to product trees for wood products.
These companies do not own the land they operate under leases, they do not have the right to sell railroad or
timber land that they use. they do not own the land nor the companies.
Mr. Payseur also owned a company by the name of "The Lancaster Cotton Oil", this company started the
manufacture of fertilizer and other related items.
Leroy Springs was appointed President of all of Mr. Payseurs companies to oversee them, he was also Mr.
Payseurs' attorney and a trustee for his affairs. He was trusted with all kinds of important documents, affidavits
and secrets, as to who the true owners were of these companies. Remember that it was stated earlier that the
northerner's couldn't get the southern people to work for them, so Northerners would appoint the old exconfederate
officers to run the companies owned by Yankees after the Civil War and all the confiscation's.
That is how Leroy Springs got involved with the Lancaster Cotton Mill, and the other companies. He was a
manager not an owner.
289

TheArchitectureOFHistory168pages

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